Oct 17, 2019  
Undergraduate Catalog 2018-2019 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2018-2019 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Finance (FINC)

  
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    FINC 354 - Investments 3 hours


    An introductory investment course designed to teach students how to make personal investing decisions for their own investment portfolio with special consideration given to the management of employer-sponsored retirement plans. Prerequisite: ACCT 281 .
  
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    FINC 361 - Small Business Finance 3 hours


    An introduction to the finance function within a small business. The focus is on the acquisition and management of capital from inception through growth. Emphasis is on the use of key financial management tools. Prerequisite: ACCT 280 .
  
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    FINC 395 - Financial Markets and Institutions 3 hours


    Examination of the risks faced by managers of financial institutions and the methods and markets through which these risks are managed. Consideration is given to a wide array of financial institutions including commercial banks, credit unions, investment banks, securities firms, insurance companies, and investment companies. Cross-listed as ECON 395 . Prerequisites: ACCT 281 ; MATH 150  or MATH 170 ; ECON 293 , ECON 294 ; FINC 350 .
  
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    FINC 396 - Corporate Finance 3 hours


    Analysis of financial and accounting information and its impact on financial decision making and profit planning. Topics include: financial planning and control tools, leverage and capital structure, investment banking, dividend policy, corporate restructuring, risk management and international financial management. Prerequisites: ACCT 281 ; MATH 150  or MATH 170 ; FINC 350 .
  
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    FINC 397 - Principles of Real Estate 3 hours


    An introduction to the principles and practices of real estate. Topics include the real estate profession and industry, home ownership, real estate financing, real estate appraisal, real estate contracts and real estate investment as it relates to personal financial planning objectives.
  
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    FINC 410 - Sports Finance 3 hours


    An integrated course that incorporates concepts from economics, finance, statistics and operations research in approaching decision making in sports management. Prerequisites: ECON 293 , ECON 294 , FINC 350 , MATH 170 , MATH 250 .
  
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    FINC 495 - International Finance 3 hours


    Understanding and application of the concepts of corporate finance, financial markets, and investments in an international context. Specific topics include an overview of the international monetary system, international financial markets (currency, equity and bond markets), the “parity conditions” of international finance, foreign exchange risk management, global investing, international capital budgeting, and global working capital management. Course meets multicultural graduation requirement. Cross-listed as ECON 495 . Prerequisites: ECON 293 , FINC 350 .
  
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    FINC 496 - Financial Management 3 hours


    Application of various financial management decision-making techniques as they apply to complex business problems. Prerequisite: FINC 396 .
  
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    FINC 498 - Comprehensive Financial Planning 3 hours


    A study of the principles and practices of professional financial planning using an integrated planning mode. Case studies allow students to simulate real-world experience by integrating tax, insurance, and investment planning strategies into comprehensive financial plans. This investments course provides a foundation in modern portfolio theory and portfolio management with special consideration given to retirement planning. Prerequisite: FINC 354 .
  
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    FINC 499 - Internship 3 hours


    Internships in the Business Administration department provide academic field experience by community theory and practice in a business setting. Internship proposals must clearly demonstrate that the student will be engaged in a field experience that is directly related to their course of study, not engaged simply in a work experience. Internship opportunities are available in a broad range of organizations: public and private; large and small; profit and non-profit. Prerequisites: senior standing, cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher, completed a minimum of 24 hours in core courses, completed a minimum of 9 Columbia College upper-level hours in Business Administration courses.

Foreign Culture (FRCS)

  
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    AFCS 101 - African Culture and Society I 3 hours


    An interdisciplinary survey of institutions, politics, cultures and societies in Africa from roughly 1800 to the present (emphasis on the period following the Second World War). This course is designed to be taken in sequence with AFCS 102   as an intensive study of the people of Africa. Meets multicultural graduation requirement.
  
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    AFCS 102 - African Culture and Society II 3 hours


    This course continues an interdisciplinary survey of institutions, politics, cultures and societies in Africa from roughly 1800 to the present (emphasis on the period following the Second World War). It is designed to be taken in sequence with AFCS 101  as an intensive study of the people of Africa. Taking AFCS 101 first will enhance your experience of this course. Meets multicultural graduation requirement.
  
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    IRCS 101 - Ireland Culture and Society 3 hours


    This course begins a survey of the social, cultural, literary, and political history of Ireland. The course is designed to be taken in sequence with Culture and Society of Ireland II as an intensive study of the Irish culture and its people. Course meets multicultural graduation requirement.
  
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    IRCS 102 - Ireland Culture and Society 3 hours


  
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    LACS 101 - Latin American Culture and Society I 3 hours


    This course begins a survey of the culture of Latin America. It is designed to be taken in sequence with LACS 102  as an intensive study of the people of Latin America. Meets multicultural graduation requirement.
  
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    LACS 102 - Latin American Culture and Society II 3 hours


    This course continues a survey of the culture of Latin America. It is designed to be taken in sequence with LACS 101  as an intensive study of the people of Latin America. Taking LACS 101 first will enhance your experience of this course. Meets multicultural graduation requirement.
  
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    MECS 101 - Middle Eastern Culture and Society I 3 hours


    This course begins a survey of Middle Eastern culture. It explores formative events and institutions that have shaped Middle Eastern culture with an emphasis on the manner in which East and West meet and perceive their respective cultures. The course is designed to be taken in sequence with MECS 102  as an intensive study of the people of the Middle East. Meets multicultural graduation requirement.
  
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    MECS 102 - Middle Eastern Culture and Society II 3 hours


    This course continues a survey of Middle Eastern culture. It explores formative events and institutions that have shaped Middle Eastern culture with an emphasis on the manner in which East and West meet and perceive their respective cultures. The course is designed to be taken in sequence with MECS 101  as an intensive study of the people of the Middle East. Taking MECS 101 first will enhance your experience of this course. Meets multicultural graduation requirement.
  
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    RUCS 101 - Russian Culture and Society 3 hours


    This course surveys Russian culture and society from early medieval times to the present. It explores the origins of Russian mentality and basic elements unique to Russian civilization using a combination of sources from history, literature, visual arts, music, religion, and philosophy. Course meets multicultural graduation requirement.
  
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    SACS 101 - South Asian Culture and Society I 3 hours


    This course begins a survey of the cultures of South Asia, including India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Maldives, Nepal, and Bhutan. It examines the cultural, religious, and historic influences that have shaped the South Asian region throughout the centuries and which continue to play a key role within contemporary South Asian societies. The course is designed to be taken in sequence with SACS 102  as an intensive study of the people of South Asia. Meets multicultural graduation requirement.
  
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    SACS 102 - South Asian Culture and Society II 3 hours


    An exploration of the societies and cultures of South Asia, including India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Nepal, and Bhutan. This course will allow the students with a theoretical knowledge of South Asia to examine the diversity and realities of a number of South Asian societies. Students will gain a more in-depth understanding of South Asian social norms, social hierarchy, religious practice, political conflict, immigration and folklore. Course meets multicultural graduation requirement. It is strongly recommended that students take SACS 101  before taking this class.

French (FREN)

  
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    FRCS 101 - French Culture and Society 3 hours


    The course provides an intensive survey of French culture and society. Course meets multicultural graduation requirement.
  
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    FREN 101 - Elementary French I 3 hours


    French 101 emphasizes elementary proficiency in listening comprehension, oral expression, reading, and writing of French, as well as basic understanding of French-speaking cultures. Prerequisites: Not open to native speakers or students who have had three or more years (six semesters) of high school French.
  
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    FREN 102 - Elementary French II 3 hours


    French 102 is a direct continuation of French 101, with further development of the four language skills and continued introduction to French-speaking cultures. Prerequisites: FREN 101  with a grade of C or higher or two years (four semesters) of high school French.  Not open to native speakers.
  
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    FREN 103 - Intermediate French I 3 hours


    French 103 reinforces and expands the skills of listening comprehension, oral expression, reading, writing, and cross-cultural understanding. Prerequisite: FREN 102  with a grade of C or higher or four years (eight semesters) of high school French. Not open to native speakers.
  
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    FREN 104 - Intermediate French II 3 hours


    French 104 focuses on advanced French grammar, composition, and conversation, as well as the exploration of French-speaking cultures via selected readings and media clips. The class is taught in French. Emphasis is on reading, conversation, and writing. Prerequisite:  FREN 103  with a grade of C or higher. Not open to native speakers.

Forensic Science (FRSC)

  
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    FRSC 210 - Introduction to Forensic Science 3 hours


    An introduction to forensic science, including discussion of the role of the forensic scientist in the criminal justice system, forensic evidence, basic techniques and instrumentation used to analyze forensic evidence.
  
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    FRSC 305 - Forensic Anthropology 3 hours


    Anthropological principles and knowledge applied within the legal system. Examination of the basics of bone biology, methods of skeletal analysis, signs of pathology and trauma, and postmortem interval. Prerequisite:  junior standing.
  
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    FRSC 310 - Professional Issues in Forensic Science 3 hours


    Examination of professional topics and current issues relevant to the forensic scientist. Prerequisite: FRSC 210 ; this course is only open to Forensic Science majors or minors, unless an exception is granted.
  
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    FRSC 315 - Forensic Microscopy 3 hours


    Examination of the theoretical foundations of microscopy, with an emphasis on stereomicroscopy and polarized light microscopy. Techniques are applied to the analysis of forensic evidence. Prerequisites: FRSC 210  and CHEM 110  or alternatively, FRSC 210  with Corequisite of PHYS 112  or PHYS 212 
  
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    FRSC 327 - Fingerprint Evidence 3 hours


    Exploration of the techniques and methods of identification, capture and analysis of fingerprint evidence, including consideration of the fundamentals of fingerprint patterns, classification formulas and extensions, scarred patterns, amputations and missing fingers, filing sequence, searching and referencing, Henry Classification, techniques for taking good fingerprints, problems in fingerprinting, latent impressions, powdering and lifting latent impressions, preparation of fingerprint charts for court testimony, and practice exercises for capturing fingerprints on a ten print card and live scan fingerprint machines. Prerequisites: CJAD 101  and a declared Criminal Justice or Forensic Science major.
  
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    FRSC 333 - Topics 1-3 hours


    Specialized inquiry into a defined concept, topic, theory or application in forensic science. Topics are approved by the Department of Physical and Biological Sciences.
  
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    FRSC 335L - Criminalistics Lab 2 hours


    Criminalistics laboratory covers the basic biology, chemistry and instrumentation techniques used in the analysis of forensic evidence. Prerequisites: FRSC 210  or concurrent enrollment, CHEM 110 , CHEM 111L , BIOL 110 , BIOL 110L , Junior standing. $40 lab fee applicable to main campus day only.
  
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    FRSC 406 - Expert and Scientific Evidence 3 hours


    Examination of the role and function of expert and scientific evidence in the legal system, and critical evaluation of the standards governing the integration of law and science. Topics include the Frye, Daubert and other standards governing scientific evidence; ethical issues concerning expert testimony; the interface between the scientific, legal and law enforcement communities; and particularized consideration of evidentiary issues connected with specific scientific techniques. Cross-listed as CJAD 406 . Prerequisite: junior standing.
  
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    FRSC 415 - Forensic Biology 4 hours


    An introduction to the methods, instrumentation, and special considerations used in the forensic analysis of biological evidence, such as blood and other human bodily fluids. Introduction to DNA extraction, quantitation and amplification, as well as statistical interpretation of the data. Prerequisite: BIOL 254 .
  
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    FRSC 425 - Forensic Chemistry 3 hours


    A study of the methods and instrumental techniques commonly used in the analysis of chemical evidence. The application of polarized light microscopy, thin layer and gas chromatography, infrared and Raman spectroscopy and mass spectrometry will be assessed. Cross-listed as CHEM 425 Prerequisites: FRSC 210 CHEM 312 CHEM 312L , CHEM 337 Corequisite: CHEM 425L .
  
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    FRSC 425L - Forensic Chemistry Laboratory 2 hours


    The laboratory companion to Forensic Chemistry. Application  of the major techniques and instruments used in the analysis of chemical forensic evidence, including microscopy, thin layer chromatography, gas chromatography and other relevant separation techniques, UV-visible spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Cross-listed as CHEM 425L . Prerequisites: FRSC 210 CHEM 312 , CHEM 312L , CHEM 337 Corequisite: FRSC 425 .
  
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    FRSC 430 - Physical and Chemical Methods in Forensic Science 3 hours


    A survey of physical, chemical and trace evidence encountered in the forensic laboratory and the methods used to analyze such evidence. Techniques utilized in the collection, preservation and interpretation of impression and physical match evidence will be discussed. The analysis of chemical and trace evidence, such as hairs, fibers and paint evidence, will be assessed. Prerequisites: CHEM 312 , CHEM 312L , FRSC 210 Corequisite: FRSC 430L 
  
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    FRSC 430L - Physical and Chemical Methods in Forensic Science Laboratory 2 hours


    The laboratory component of Physical and Chemical Methods in Forensic Science.  A hands-on introduction to the methods used to analyze physical, chemical and trace evidence. Techniques utilized in the collection, preservation and interpretation of impression and physical match evidence will be employed. Chemical and trace evidence, such as hairs, fibers and paint evidence, will be analyzed. PrerequisitesCHEM 312 , CHEM 312L , FRSC 210 CorequisiteFRSC 430 

     

  
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    FRSC 433 - Topics 1-3 hours


    Specialized inquiry into a defined concept, topic, theory or application in forensic science. Topics are approved by the Department of Physical and Biological Sciences.
  
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    FRSC 445 - Forensic Pathology 3 hours


    Analysis of systems and methods of determining time, cause, and means of death in criminal investigation and trials. Prerequisites: CJAD 101  and junior standing.
  
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    FRSC 475 - Senior Seminar in Forensic Science 3 hours


    A seminar course required as a culminating experience for all seniors majoring in Forensic Science. This capstone course integrates prior learning while exploring current research, contemporary issues and professional standards in forensic science. Completion with a grade of C or higher is required. Prerequisites: senior standing and a declared Forensic Science major.

Fire Service Administration (FSAD)

  
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    FSAD 280 - Company Officer Strategies and Tactics 3 hours


    This course offers clear, systematic guidance on how to take control of the fire ground - even under the most adverse conditions. This course identifies best practices to safely and effectively manage fires in residential dwellings, commercial building, high-rises, places of assembly, vehicles, and in the wild.
  
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    FSAD 282 - Emergency Services Leadership 3 hours


    This course is designed for students seeking to effectively lead modern public safety organizations and the various components within them. Individuals must possess a solid understanding of the always-changing issues that face the fire and emergency medical services. Topics of this course include: management and leadership of EMS operations; budgeting financial strategies, hiring, diversity, training, education, and fire fighter safety. Value-added topics in this course will include psychology of leadership and managing confrontations.
  
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    FSAD 284 - Emergency Services Management 3 hours


    This course addresses the management knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to operate as a chief officer. Students will become familiar with technical writing, long-range planning, organizational behavior, and compiling statistics.
  
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    FSAD 286 - Fire Service Science 3 hours


    This course is designed to review the principles of building construction, combustion, and fire behavior for the fire officer.
  
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    FSAD 288 - Principles of Emergency Services, Safety and Survival 3 hours


    This course is designed to teach the student about the fire service’s history, modern components of fire and emergency services, and careers with in the industries. Additionally, students will learn about risk management, mitigation, and the 16 life safety initiatives.
  
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    FSAD 290 - Principles of Fire Prevention and Protection Services 3 hours


    This course is designed to provide thorough understanding of how fire prevention and protection programs can greatly reduce fire loss, deaths, and injuries. The course features current statistics, codes, standards and references to the latest edition of NFPA Standard 1031, Standard for Professional Qualifications for Fire Inspector and Plan Examiner.

Geography (GEOG)

  
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    GEOG 101 - Introduction to Geography 3 hours


    Introduction to the distribution of people, activities, and environments around the world; geographic patterns and the interaction of humans with their surroundings are emphasized. Course meets multicultural graduation requirement. G.E. Cross-listed as ANTH 101 .
  
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    GEOG 220 - Introduction to Atmospheric Sciences 3 hours


    An introduction to the study of weather and climate. Cross-listed as ENVS 220 . Prerequisite: sophomore standing.
  
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    GEOG 223 - Environmental Disasters 3 hours


    Introduction to environmental hazards and disasters. Emphasis on causes of extreme natural events, their geographic distribution and human responses/adjustments. Cross-listed as ENVS 223 . Prerequisite: C or higher in GEOG 101  or ENVS 115 .
  
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    GEOG 233 - Topics 1-3 hours


    Specialized inquiry into a defined concept, topic, theory or application in geography. Topics are approved by the Psychology and Sociology Department.
  
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    GEOG 251 - Resource Management 3 hours


    Introduction to the global range of natural resources, the economic and political contexts of their development and the resulting physical and societal impacts. Course meets multicultural graduation requirement. Cross-listed as ENVS 251 . Prerequisite: C or higher in GEOG 101  or ENVS 115 .
  
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    GEOG 255 - Directed Study 1-3 hours


    Individual research project covering a limited and well-focused aspect of theory, concept or application in a selected area of geography. This course requires the approval of the chair of the Psychology and Sociology Department  and is available on the main campus only. Prerequisites: completion of at least 45 semester hours of coursework, prior completion of at least 6 semester hours of geography courses, and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  
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    GEOG 256 - Directed Study 1-3 hours


    Individual research project covering a limited and well-focused aspect of theory, concept or application in a selected area of geography. This course requires the approval of the chair of the Psychology and Sociology Department  and is available on the main campus only. Prerequisites: completion of at least 45 semester hours of coursework, prior completion of at least 6 semester hours of geography courses, and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  
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    GEOG 257 - Directed Study 1-3 hours


    Individual research project covering a limited and well-focused aspect of theory, concept or application in a selected area of geography. This course requires the approval of the chair of the Psychology and Sociology Department  and is available on the main campus only. Prerequisites: completion of at least 45 semester hours of coursework, prior completion of at least 6 semester hours of geography courses, and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  
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    GEOG 355 - Directed Study 1-3 hours


    Individual research project covering a limited and well-focused aspect of theory, concept or application in a selected area of geography. This course requires the approval of the chair of the Psychology and Sociology Department  and is available on the main campus only. Prerequisites: completion of at least 45 semester hours of coursework, prior completion of at least 6 semester hours of geography courses, and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  
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    GEOG 356 - Directed Study 1-3 hours


    Individual research project covering a limited and well-focused aspect of theory, concept or application in a selected area of geography. This course requires the approval of the chair of the Psychology and Sociology Department  and is available on the main campus only. Prerequisites: completion of at least 45 semester hours of coursework, prior completion of at least 6 semester hours of geography courses, and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  
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    GEOG 357 - Directed Study 1-3 hours


    Individual research project covering a limited and well-focused aspect of theory, concept or application in a selected area of geography. This course requires the approval of the chair of the Psychology and Sociology Department  and is available on the main campus only. Prerequisites: completion of at least 45 semester hours of coursework, prior completion of at least 6 semester hours of geography courses, and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  
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    GEOG 433 - Topics 1-3 hours


    Specialized inquiry into a defined concept, topic, theory or application in geography. Topics are approved by the Psychology and Sociology Department.
  
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    GEOG 455 - Directed Study 1-3 hours


    Individual research project covering a limited and well-focused aspect of theory, concept or application in a selected area of geography. This course requires the approval of the chair of the Psychology and Sociology Department  and is available on the main campus only. Prerequisites: completion of at least 45 semester hours of coursework, prior completion of at least 6 semester hours of geography courses, and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  
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    GEOG 456 - Directed Study 1-3 hours


    Individual research project covering a limited and well-focused aspect of theory, concept or application in a selected area of geography. This course requires the approval of the chair of the Psychology and Sociology Department  and is available on the main campus only. Prerequisites: completion of at least 45 semester hours of coursework, prior completion of at least 6 semester hours of geography courses, and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  
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    GEOG 457 - Directed Study 1-3 hours


    Individual research project covering a limited and well-focused aspect of theory, concept or application in a selected area of geography. This course requires the approval of the chair of the Psychology and Sociology Department  and is available on the main campus only. Prerequisites: completion of at least 45 semester hours of coursework, prior completion of at least 6 semester hours of geography courses, and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.

Geology (GEOL)

  
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    GEOL 110 - Introduction to Physical Geology 3 hours


    An introduction to earth’s materials, geophysical processes acting on them and the resulting landforms and landscapes. G.E.
  
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    GEOL 110L - Introduction to Physical Geology Laboratory 2 hours


    Laboratory experience to accompany GEOL 110 . G.E. Prerequisite: GEOL 110  or concurrent enrollment. GEOL 110  must be completed before it can be used as G.E. credit. $40 lab fee applicable to main campus day only.

History (HIST)

  
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    HIST 101 - Western Civilization I 3 hours


    European history from Greece to 1715.
  
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    HIST 102 - Western Civilization II 3 hours


    European history since 1715. G.E.
  
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    HIST 111 - World History to 1500 3 hours


    This course surveys the major developments that have shaped the human experience from the earliest civilization to 1500 CE. The course examines overall patterns of early global history, characteristics of the world’s major premodern civilizations, and the relationships and exchanges among these societies. Major themes include humans and their environment, culture, politics and government, economics and social structures. Students also gain insight into the historical roots of many of the world’s major cultural traditions. Course meets multicultural graduation requirement. G.E.
  
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    HIST 112 - World History Since 1500 3 hours


    This course surveys the major developments that have shaped the human experience since 1500 CE. The course examines overall patterns of global history, characteristics of the world’s major modern civilizations, and the relationships and exchanges among these societies. Major themes include humans and their environment, culture, politics and government, economics, and social structures. Students also gain insight into the historical roots of many of the world’s major cultural traditions. Course meets multicultural graduation requirement. G.E.
  
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    HIST 121 - American History to 1877 3 hours


    A survey of institutions, politics, culture, and society in America from colonization to reconstruction. G.E.
  
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    HIST 122 - American History Since 1877 3 hours


    A survey of institutions, politics, culture, and society in America from reconstruction to the present. G.E.
  
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    HIST 233 - Topics 3 hours


    Selected courses approved by the History and Social Sciences Department for history credit.
  
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    HIST 294 - Introduction to the Historian’s Craft 3 hours


    Designed for the history major, but open to non-majors as well, this course provides hands-on exploration of what historians do, and gives students a broad foundation in learning how to think and work as historians. Students will assess the causes of events, and the reliability of evidence. They will also learn how to critically analyze primary and secondary sources, and be introduced to a variety of approaches to history–including oral history, quantitative history, digital history and aspects of historiography. As a central project, students will craft a research proposal as a solid foundation for more advanced work in the history major/minor. Completion with a grade of “C” or higher is required for History majors. Prerequisite: Six hours of history courses at the 100 level.
  
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    HIST 303 - History and Philosophy of Modern Science 3 hours


    Evolution of scientific thought from 1600 A.D. to the present. Cross-listed as PHIL 303 . Prerequisite: HIST 102 .
  
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    HIST 304 - History of Latin America 3 hours


    Survey of the history of Latin America from the colonial period to the present. The study of the development of colonial structures, the impact of colonization on the native peoples, the struggle for independence, colonial legacies, economic dependency, and ethnic, gender, and class relations helps students to gain an understanding of the major themes in Latin American history. The class also considers the relationship between Latin American countries and the United States, as well as political and social movements throughout the region. The class considers examples from the histories of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela. Course meets multicultural graduation requirement. Prerequisite: junior standing.
  
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    HIST 312 - 20th Century American Diplomatic History 3 hours


    Diplomacy since 1890s and emergence of the nation as a world power. Prerequisite: HIST 122 .
  
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    HIST 314 - Modern China 3 hours


    Chinese history since 1800. Course meets multicultural graduation requirement. Prerequisite: junior standing.
  
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    HIST 316 - Modern Japan 3 hours


    Japanese history since 1800. Course meets multicultural graduation requirement. Prerequisite: junior standing.
  
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    HIST 318 - The U.S. and the Vietnam War 3 hours


    Analysis of American involvement in the Vietnam War from 1954 to 1975. The events of the armed conflict are placed in a multiplicity of contexts to reveal political, diplomatic, military, social, and economic factors.  This course considers the deployment of armed forces in addition to the impact of the peace movement.  Significant attention will be given to the challenges of the Cold War, the dynamics of popular culture, and the collapse of South Vietnam.  Prerequisite: HIST 122 .
  
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    HIST 319 - History and Democracy in the Modern Middle East 3 hours


    As an introduction to the social, political, religious and intellectual history of the Middle East from the 1700s to the present day, this course pays particular attention to the following topics: the nature of the Middle Eastern social and political institutions; tensions between reform and purifying impulses in Islamic religious currents; the Ottoman period, western imperialism; paths of modernization; the Arab-Israeli conflict; the historical context for the emergence of political Islam; and the Arab Spring of 2011. Course meets multicultural graduation requirement. Cross-listed as ANTH 319 . Prerequisite: HIST 102  or HIST 112 .
  
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    HIST 321 - History of the Modern U.S. 3 hours


    Analysis of the reformation of the United States during the era of Franklin D. Roosevelt. The course explores the story of how Americans endured the Great Depression and eventually prevailed in their struggle against totalitarianism. In particular, it highlights the anxieties of the new era, the stock market crash of 1928, the New Deal policies of FDR and the military campaigns of World War II. Significant themes of gender, class, power and warfare are traced from the twilight of the roaring twenties to the dawn of the atomic age. Prerequisite: HIST 122 .
  
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    HIST 322 - Women and Gender in World History 3 hours


    This course examines the history of women around the globe from 1500 to the present. This course examines gender as a system of power relations that has been integral to the shaping of national and international politics and public policy and to the development of national and international economies. The class explores the meanings of women’s status across continents, cultures and historical periods; examines how women have attempted to define, maintain or gain power in changing historical circumstances; identifies common dilemmas and struggles faced by women; and considers how changing definitions of gender have intersected with ideas about race and ethnicity throughout world history. Cross-listed as WMST 322 . Prerequisite: junior standing.
  
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    HIST 329 - Warfare, Witches, and Life in Early Modern Europe, 1550-1700 3 hours


    Early modern Europe served as a kind of precedent for modern life, through developments such as the nationstate, free-trade economies, competitive empire-building, and science and industry. The course explores traditional topics such as the Reformation, the Thirty Years’ War, absolutism and constitutionalism, and the Scientific Revolution, as well as more recent histories of women, popular culture, sexuality, peasant life, and magic. Prerequisite: HIST 101   or HIST 111 .
  
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    HIST 332 - The European Renaissance 3 hours


    During the age of the Renaissance scholars, artists, ecclesiastics, princes and courtiers consciously turned from medieval tradition and cultivated a renewal of classical Greek and Roman cultures. This course explores the cultural, intellectual, religious, political and economic lives of the men and women of Renaissance Europe from its inception in mid-fourteenth-century Italy to its culmination in Early Modern Northern Europe.  Prerequisite: HIST 101 or HIST 111.
  
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    HIST 334 - The European Enlightenment 3 hours


    This course traces the transformation of European culture and society between the last decades of the 17th century and the end of the 18th century. Texts include political and philosophical essays, theological works, and examples from the “literary underground” of the 18th century. While drawing significantly on select major writers such as Voltaire, Diderot, Condorcet and the Scottish moralists, the course also examines figures who are sometimes overlooked in introductory surveys, such as Daniel Defoe, Richard Price and Mary Wollstonecraft. The overall goal of the course is to provide both an extended contact with the works of one particular historical period, and to survey the different ways in which historians have approached the period. Prerequisite: HIST 102  or HIST 112 .
  
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    HIST 335 - 19th Century Europe 3 hours


    This course focuses on the major transformations in European politics, economics, culture and society between the French Revolution and World War I. Topics include Napoleonic Europe, industrialization, the emergence of class as a concept for explaining fundamental social change, the revolutions of 1848, the unification of Germany and Italy, the expansion of European imperialism especially as seen in Africa, and the convergence of tensions which contributed to the outbreak of World War I. Prerequisite: HIST 102  or HIST 112 .
  
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    HIST 336 - 20th Century Europe 3 hours


    Exploration of patterns of difference and commonality across the countries of Europe. From World War I through the Russian Revolution, the rise of fascism and totalitarianism, and through the Cold War, an often ferocious ideological battle between liberal democracy, communism and fascism dominated European life. As the Cold War came to an end and the ideal of a united European community emerged, the relations between countries and peoples changed dramatically. Moreover, in almost all of these aspects of European relations, the workings of nationality, race, and ethnicity played important roles. In addition to confronting the profound ethical dilemmas which accompanied one of the darkest centuries of Europe’s history, students complete this class with a factual and conceptual understanding of the dynamic political, economic, social and cultural factors which affected Europe between 1914 and the 21st century. Prerequisite: HIST 102  or HIST 112 .
  
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    HIST 337 - Fascism in Europe, 1900-1945 3 hours


    Explores how and why fascist groups achieved power in European states during the early 20th century. Topics include political mobilization, social engineering, resistance and collaboration, racism/anti-Semitism, and gender policies, foreign policy, imperial aims and mass violence. The course concludes by exploring the legacies fascists left behind for Europe and the world. Prerequisite: HIST 102  or HIST 112 .
  
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    HIST 339 - History of Modern Africa 3 hours


    This course offers a history of Africa from the early nineteenth century to the present day. The course examines the European imperial scramble to colonize Africa during the later 1800s and early 1900s, the broader integration of African societies into the world economy during that process, the social, political and cultural impact of imperial policies, Western popular images of Africa in the colonial period, the nationalist struggles that resulted in the independent African states, and the achievements of - and persistent problems faced by - those post-colonial states. Cross-listed as ANTH 339. Prerequisite: HIST 102 or HIST 112.
  
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    HIST 340 - Philosophy of Revolution 3 hours


    Examination of the nature of revolution-intellectual, philosophical, economic and political. Cross-listed as PHIL 340 .
  
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    HIST 342 - American Civil War 3 hours


    Analysis of the American Civil War during the 19th century. The course assesses the causes and the consequences of the sectional conflict between the North and the South. In particular, it examines the politics of chattel slavery, the crisis of the federal Constitution, the campaigns of the Union and Confederate forces and the plans for post-war reconstruction. Furthermore, significant themes of politics, gender, warfare and labor are considered. Prerequisite: HIST 121 .
  
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    HIST 348 - World War II 3 hours


    Analysis of the causes and consequences of the Second World War from a transnational perspective. This course examines the major events of the armed conflict from 1939 to 1945 while featuring the remembrances of combatants and non-combatants in Europe and Asia. The impact of “total war” on modernity is considered, as is the geopolitical realignment of the post-war world. Prerequisite: HIST 102  or HIST 112 .
  
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    HIST 350 - American Revolution 3 hours


    Analysis of the American Revolution during the eighteenth century.  This course considers the causes and the consequences of the colonial rebellion against the British Empire in North America.  In particular, it focuses upon the cultural, economic, military, and constitutional issues shaping the struggle for independence.  Significant attention will be given to the clash of values, interests, arms, and ambitions transforming the thirteen colonies into the United States before 1789. Prerequisite: HIST 121 .
  
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    HIST 352 - American Environmental History 3 hours


    Analysis of America’s environmental history from the colonial period to the present.  This course considers the interrelationships between human society and the natural world in different bioregions of North America, focusing upon how ideas, institutions, and technologies have evolved over time.  It traces American Indian ecology, agricultural land use, natural resource conservation, and recent environmental activism.  It offers special attention to the significance of wilderness in the American past. Cross-listed as ENVS 352 . Prerequisite: Junior standing.
  
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    HIST 353 - Missouri History 3 hours


    Survey of Missouri’s development from colonization to the present. This course examines the contributions of Missouri and its inhabitants to the development of the U.S. In particular, it will highlight the state’s government over the years. Prerequisite: Junior standing.
  
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    HIST 358 - The Making of Modern Britain 3 hours


    Exploration of the most important social, economic and political developments in Britain since the beginning of the 18th century covers topics including the rise of industrial society, Victorian ideas and attitudes, British feminism, the rise and fall of the British Empire, the emergence of the Labour Party and British socialism, the impact of the two world wars and postwar political and social changes. Certain themes are stressed, such as the relationship between elite and popular politics, the development of the state, changing configurations of empire, and transformations in social and gender relations. Prerequisite: HIST 102  or HIST 112 .
  
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    HIST 359 - The Rise and Fall of the British Empire 3 hours


    This course traces the emergence of an England-centered empire, which from the 1600s to the near-present facilitated a vast and violent movement of goods, peoples, technologies, diseases, cultural artifacts, and cultural practices.  Attention is paid to issues of negotiation, domination and resistance; the effects of gender across cultures; politicization, identity formation, and nationalism; the complications and uses of race; and the empire’s effects on Britain.  Prerequisite: HIST 102 or HIST 112.
  
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    HIST 362 - History of the American West 3 hours


    Analysis of Western America from colonization to the present. The course traces the imperial, commercial, intellectual and social relationships constituting the trans-Mississippi region. In particular, it appraises the interactions of diverse populations in a frontier borderland over the course of several generations. Furthermore, significant attention is given to territorial acquisition, population mobility, economic development and popular culture. Prerequisite: junior standing.
  
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    HIST 370 - American Military History 3 hours


    Analysis of the military history of the United States from the colonial period to the present.  This course considers the role and use of armed forces in relation to the social, cultural, political, economic, and technological development of the United States.  It will not only address such themes as wartime strategy, operational tactics, and combat technology, but also the impact of warfare on society and on the remembrances of ordinary men and women in uniform.  Significant attention will be given to the evolution of civil-military relations, the advent of professionalism in the military, the non-military uses of the military, and the military’s role as a tool for global power. Prerequisite: junior standing.
  
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    HIST 371 - History of American Business 3 hours


    Analysis of American business from the colonial period to the present. The course traces the entrepreneurial adventures of small as well as large firms.  It will focus upon economic processes that created a modern industrial order, wherein corporations assumed a dominant position in the development of the United States. Significant attention will be given to key leaders of the free enterprise system. Cross-listed as MGMT 371 . Prerequisite: junior standing.
 

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