Dec 05, 2022  
Undergraduate Catalog 2019-2020 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2019-2020 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Public Administration (PADM)

  
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    PADM 340 - Values and Ethics in Public Administration 3 hours


    Course covers issues related to the ethical practices of public administrators including the proper role of unelected bureaucrats in government and how they relate to citizens.  Students are exposed to philosophical arguments related to ethical behavior.  Course does not satisfy the general education ethics requirement.  Prerequisite/corequisite: PADM 311 /POSC 311 /MGMT 311 .
  
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    PADM 395 - Political Science and Public Administration Research Methods 3 hours


    An introduction to the research processes used by political science and public administration. The scope of political science and public administration research and the methods used to address political and policy questions are studied. Cross-listed as POSC 395 . Prerequisite: three previous courses in political science or public administration.
  
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    PADM 399 - Public Administration Internship 3-6 hours


    Students complete 45 hours of experiential work for each semester hour. Students typically work in a governmental office responsible for administering public policy on the national, state, or local level or in the office of a non-profit organization. Students pursuing the Bachelor of Arts in Public Administration must enroll for three semester hours and students pursuing the Bachelor of Science must enroll in six hours. The directing faculty member must approve the internship placement. Grades are assigned as S (satisfactory) or U (unsatisfactory).Prerequisites: POSC 111 ; MGMT 311 /PADM 311 /POSC 311 ; junior standing; minimum 2.5 cumulative GPA at time of registration of internship.
  
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    PADM 495 - Senior Seminar in Political Science and Public Administration 3 hours


    Culminating experience for graduation with a B.A. in Political Science and B.A. or B.S. in Public Administration. Requires original research project and final paper. Grade of C or higher required. Cross-listed as POSC 495 . Prerequisite: PADM 395  or POSC 395 .

Religious Studies (RELI)

  
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    RELI 101 - Religion and Human Experience 3 hours


    Provides an objective setting to encourage students to examine religion and various religious traditions in the world, with opportunities to understand religion in the context of their own experiences. Course meets multicultural graduation requirement.
  
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    RELI 124 - The Bible as Literature 3 hours


    A literary and historical approach to major biblical selections and their influence on western literature, culture and philosophy.
  
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    RELI 201 - Religious Classic Texts 3 hours


    Introduction to the classic primary sources of world religions. From ancient Mesopotamia to modern classics of religious experience, the student reads, analyzes and compares the written accounts of human contemplation of the divine across time and culture. Course meets multicultural graduation requirement.
  
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    RELI 202 - Asian Philosophy & Religion 3 hours


    Examination of philosophy, religion, and belief systems of Eastern cultures, past and present. Students study the various traditional “systems of thought” from India, China, Tibet and Japan. Course meets multicultural graduation requirement. Cross-listed as PHIL 202 .
  
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    RELI 350 - Philosophy of Religion 3 hours


    Philosophical exploration of the classical issues of theistic religious thought, such as the reality of God, the problem of evil, religious language, life after death and the pluralism of religious traditions. Cross-listed as PHIL 350 . Prerequisite:  PHIL 201  or RELI 101 .
  
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    RELI 381 - History of Christianity: Early Church 3 hours


    Development of Christianity from its origins to the eve of the Reformation. Emphasis is on the evolution of theology within the context of Western civilization. Specific subjects include ancient Hebrew thought, Hellenism, gnosticism, the historical Jesus, the Trinity, Augustine, medieval theology, heresies, etc. Cross-listed as HIST 381 . Prerequisite: HIST 101  or HIST 111 .
  
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    RELI 382 - Christianity in the Modern World 3 hours


    Development of Christian thought from the late Middle Ages to the present. Emphasis is on the confrontation of Christian theology with modernity. Specific subjects are: the Reformation, Counter-Reformation, the scientific revolution, the Enlightenment, Liberal Theology, the Theology of Crisis, etc. Cross-listed as HIST 382 Prerequisite: HIST 102  or HIST 112 .
  
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    RELI 390 - The Buddha and Buddhism 3 hours


    Introduction to the study of Buddhist philosophy and religious traditions, beginning with the life of Siddhartha Gautama, through the development of Buddhism in ancient India-Theravada and Mahavana, the spread of Buddhism to China, Tibet, and Japan. The course concludes with the examination of the coming of Buddhism to the West. Cross-listed as PHIL 390 . Prerequisite: Junior standing.
  
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    RELI 400 - Religion and Science 3 hours


    A study of the contemporary encounter of science and religion in the light of their historical background, aims, methods, points of conflict and possible dialogue. Subjects include: logos and mythos, the case of Galileo, Newton, Darwinism, Einstein’s religion, creation and Big Bang, Creationism and Design, Anthropic Principle, contingency and necessity, God, secular humanism. Prerequisite: junior standing.

Sociology (SOCI)

  
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    SOCI 101 - Social Justice 3 hours


    Exploration of issues surrounding social justice, including human rights, democracy, freedom, happiness, equality, peace, violence, tolerance, and social responsibility. Introduction to reasoning and logic. Intellectual empathy. 
  
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    SOCI 111 - General Sociology 3 hours


    Introductory study of small and large scale human social interaction and social organizations. Course meets multicultural graduation requirement.
  
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    SOCI 112 - General Anthropology 3 hours


    This course explores the diversity of humanity both in the past and in the present. Anthropology provides a uniquely broad understanding of humankind by integrating the study of human evolution, ancient civilizations, languages, and cultures from around the world. Based on a wide range of case-studies, this course explores what it means to be human, and how it is differently experienced in societies and cultures around the world. Course meets Multicultural graduation requirement. Crosslisted with ANTH 112 .

     

  
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    SOCI 175 - Introduction to Theory-based Research and Writing 3 hours


    Introduction to theory-based research and writing in social and behavioral sciences. Cross-listed as PSYC 175 . Prerequisite: PSYC 101  or SOCI 111 ; grade of C or higher in ENGL 133W .
  
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    SOCI 210 - The Sociology of Gender 3 hours


    Critical examination of gender as a social construct. The role of gender in socialization, sexuality, family, religion, work, the mass media, education and politics. Cross-listed as WMST 210 .
  
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    SOCI 212 - Cultures in the World 3 hours


    This course explores the concept of culture and its diversity in the world. Taking a comparative approach based on case studies from different world regions, and paying particular attention to how cultures change over time, this course explores some of the major themes of cultural anthropology, including the cultural construction of reality, identity, language, social hierarchy, art, and kinship and gender relations. Cross-listed as ANTH 212 . Course meets Multicultural graduation requirement. 
  
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    SOCI 214 - Family 3 hours


    Survey of structures, functions, processes, and problems in the contemporary family.
  
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    SOCI 216 - American Social Problems 3 hours


    Nature and impact of contemporary social problems. 
  
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    SOCI 218 - Social Deviance 3 hours


    Introduction to theories and models of deviant behavior. Reinforcement of the sociological perspective on human behavior. Social control and the construction of categories of deviance. Analysis of social conditions which impacts rates of deviance including violence, sexual deviance, mental illness, substance abuse, street crime and white collar crime. Societal responses to deviance. The uses of stigma to label deviants. 
  
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    SOCI 224 - Statistics for the Behavioral and Natural Sciences 3 hours


    The study of parametric and nonparametric statistics commonly used in the behavioral and natural sciences. Included are analyses of relationship and variance, as well as effect sizes associated with each. Students majoring in Biology, Psychology or Sociology must earn a grade of C or higher. Cross-listed as BIOL 224 /PSYC 224 . Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in MATH 150  or higher level math course (excludes MATH 200).
  
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    SOCI 225 - *Quantitative Research Methods 3 hours


    Study of applied research in the behavioral sciences, with an emphasis on design, methodology, results interpretation and theory building. Quantitative approaches are addressed, employing both parametric and nonparametric statistics. Cross-listed as PSYC 225 . Students majoring in Psychology must earn a grade of C or higher. Prerequisites: Grade of C or higher in PSYC 224 /SOCI 224 .
  
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    SOCI 230 - Sports and Society 3 hours


    Survey of social theories and projected role of the patterns of sports and heroism in society.
  
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    SOCI 235 - *Social Psychology 3 hours


    Theories, methods and research on the nature and causes of individual behavior in social situations. Cross-listed as PSYC 235 . Prerequisite: PSYC 101 ; and PSYC 175 /SOCI 175  taken previously or concurrently.

     

  
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    SOCI 270 - Minority Cultures and Relations 3 hours


    Survey of historical and contemporary minority/majority relations among various racial, ethnic, and gender groups. Focus on the social construction of race and ethnicity. Course meets the multicultural graduation requirement. Cross-listed as ANTH 270 .
  
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    SOCI 310 - Women and Society 3 hours


    Analysis of the social and cultural forces that shape women’s position in society; explanations and critical analysis of the gendered nature of our reality. Cross-listed as WMST 310 .
  
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    SOCI 321 - Criminology 3 hours


    Emphasis on sociological theories concerning the nature, sources, control, and prevention of crime. Topics include current trends in U.S. crime rates; media coverage of crimes; patterns of victimization; characteristics of property crimes, violent crimes, drug crimes, corporate crimes, political crimes and vice. Critical examination of current law enforcement and correctional policies and practices. Prerequisite: junior standing.
  
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    SOCI 327 - Qualitative Research Methods 3 hours


    Understanding qualitative research and developing qualitative research skills, examining exemplars in the field, exploring the various qualitative research methodologies such as participant-observation and in-depth interviewing and the theoretical and ethical dilemmas associated with each. Data collection, writing field notes and transforming such data into written ethnographic documents are emphasized. Crosslisted as ANTH 327 /PSYC 327 . Prerequisite: Junior standing.
  
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    SOCI 328 - Independent Research 3 hours


    Applying qualitative and/or quantitative research methods in applied research to produce manuscripts and academic conference presentations. Conducting archival and experimental or field research to answer research questions. Using appropriate research skills, producing written research findings in APA style and presenting research findings at a conference of academic peers. Cross-listed as PSYC 328 . Prerequisite: junior standing, 3.0 GPA, PSYC 224 , PSYC 225 .
  
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    SOCI 331 - Juvenile Delinquency 3 hours


    Emphasis on sociological theories concerning the nature, sources, control, and prevention of juvenile delinquency.  Topics include current trends in U.S. juvenile crime rates; media coverage of juvenile delinquency; patterns of victimization; characteristics of crimes committed by juveniles. Critical examination of current juvenile correctional policies and practices. Comparison of various treatment models in juvenile delinquency. Prerequisite: junior standing.
  
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    SOCI 333 - Topics 1-3 hours


    Specialized inquiry into a defined concept, topic, theory or application in sociology. Topics are approved by the Psychology and Sociology Department.
  
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    SOCI 336 - Gender and Globalization 3 hours


    Critical analysis of the history and discourse surrounding globalization, with special emphasis on its gendered effect. Attention is paid to the often invisible micro macro connections between individual lives across the globe. The distribution of power and its impact on development processes is examined. The impact of gender dynamics within social institutions: economic, political, and cultural are also examined. Course meets Multicultural graduation requirement. Cross-listed as ANTH 336  /WMST 336 . Prerequisite: Junior standing.

     

  
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    SOCI 340 - Ethics and Social Responsibility 3 hours


    This course explores the basis of ethical concepts and the meaning of social responsibility in social and behavioral research. The course also exposes students to potential ethical dilemmas in research. Student will learn to situate themselves in the broader social implications of research findings. Cross-listed with PSYC 340 .
  
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    SOCI 341 - Religion and Society 3 hours


    Examines the sources and roles of religion in societies. Offers an introduction to the major sociological theories and concepts about religions and religious movements. Provides a cross-cultural approach to religious systems and practices. Focuses on how religion fosters social integration and community, but also power, oppression and discrimination. These themes are discussed using examples of the religious perspectives on and experiences of women, gays/lesbians, and ethnic minorities. Course meets multicultural graduation requirement. Crosslisted as ANTH 341 . Prerequisite: Junior standing.

     

  
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    SOCI 345 - Environment and Society 3 hours


    This course explores the interaction between social processes and the natural environment. Taking a multidisciplinary approach (sociology and anthropology), and building on theoretical perspectives and cross-cultural case studies, this course investigates the increasing pressure of human activities on the environment, the globalization of environmental challenges, the privatization of natural resources (water, forests, energy sources, but also genes and genetically modified organisms), the policies encouraging this privatization process, and the recent growth of environmental social movements. Cross-listed as ANTH 345 . Prerequisite:  junior standing.

     

  
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    SOCI 350 - Social Gerontology 3 hours


    Social, psychological and physical aspects of aging, including the consequences of the societal demographic shifts toward an increasingly aged society. Investigate the research on death and dying and the role of the elderly in our society. Additionally, generate an understanding of the theoretical perspectives on aging. Cross-listed as HUMS 350 . Prerequisite: junior standing.
  
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    SOCI 355 - Directed Study 1-3 hours


    Individual research project covering a limited and well-focused aspect of theory, concept or application in a selected area of sociology. This course requires the approval of the chair of the Psychology and Sociology Department  and is available on the main campus only. Prerequisites: completion of at least 45 semester hours of coursework, prior completion of at least 6 semester hours of psychology courses, and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  
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    SOCI 356 - Directed Study 1-3 hours


    Individual research project covering a limited and well-focused aspect of theory, concept or application in a selected area of sociology. This course requires the approval of the chair of the Psychology and Sociology Department  and is available on the main campus only. Prerequisites: completion of at least 45 semester hours of coursework, prior completion of at least 6 semester hours of psychology courses, and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  
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    SOCI 357 - Directed Study 1-3 hours


    Individual research project covering a limited and well-focused aspect of theory, concept or application in a selected area of sociology. This course requires the approval of the chair of the Psychology and Sociology Department  and is available on the main campus only. Prerequisites: completion of at least 45 semester hours of coursework, prior completion of at least 6 semester hours of psychology courses, and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  
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    SOCI 365 - American Social Policy 3 hours


    Emphasis on the nature and development of American social policy, including the history of current structures of social welfare services, the role of policy in service delivery and analyses of current social policy issues including family policy, health care policy, drug policy, tax policy, and other topical issues. Cross-listed as HUMS 365 Prerequisite: junior standing.
  
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    SOCI 375 - Social Movements 3 hours


    Emphasis on sociological analysis of social movements of twentieth century America. Emphasis on the application of sociological theories to the conditions that facilitate social movements, from their development to how success is measured. Case studies of the Progressive era reform movements, the labor movement, the women’s movement, the environmental movement, the gay rights movement, the civil rights movement, ethnic identity movements, anti-globalization movements, Occupy Wall Street, and other movements. Cross-listed as AMST 375 . Prerequisite: junior standing.
  
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    SOCI 380 - Mass Media and Society 3 hours


    Emphasis on critical examination of contemporary mass media, including television, film, advertising and news. Sociological theories of mass media. History of mass media. Social impacts of mass media. Political influences on mass media. Information flows in democratic societies. Sexism, racism, classism, heterosexism, and ethnocentrism in mass media. Advertising and consumerism. Popular culture. The internet. Offered odd spring. Prerequisite: Junior standing.
  
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    SOCI 381 - Music and Society 3 hours


    This course explores music as a social and cultural activity. Taking a global, comparative, and inter-disciplinary approach (sociology and anthropology), it investigates the social dimensions of the production and reception of music. Particular attention will be given to issues of race, gender, identities, and technology. How do music and societies mutually influence and shape each other? How is music related to people’s sense of identity, socio-economic structures, and beliefs? Music will be explored as an art form that both reveals and serves as a medium of social change. Prerequisites: Junior standing. Cross-listed as ANTH 381 .

     

  
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    SOCI 385 - Human Sexuality 3 hours


    Exploration of sexuality from psychological and social perspectives. Critical issues directly and indirectly associated with sexual behavior are addressed. Human sexual behavior is openly discussed in this course and is illustrated in the textbooks. Cross-listed as PSYC 385 . Prerequisite: PSYC 101  or SOCI 111 .
  
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    SOCI 388W - Fashion and Society 3 hours


    Critical examination of fashion as an institution, shaping individual choices, and communicating social values and norms. Attention is paid to how fashion serves as a tool for individual expression and as a way to showcase social affiliation. Fashion is analyzed as both an art form and as a powerful industry. Topics include: Art and industry; Body; Consumerism; Dressing in modern society; Global style; Individual and group identity; Inequality; Social movements; Trends. Cross-listed as WMST 388W . Prerequisite: ENGL 133W 
  
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    SOCI 401 - The City 3 hours


    Emphasis on the history, structure, and function of cities; current trends and issues facing U.S. communities; impact of demographic changes on communities; roles of corporations; governments; voluntary organizations; and individuals in shaping communities. The impact of urban design on communities; new urbanism; pocket neighborhoods; and international communities are also emphasized. Prerequisite: junior standing.
  
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    SOCI 401W - The City 3 hours


    In-depth analysis of the challenges that cities face in the 21st century, including social, economic, political, and environmental issues. Prerequisite: Junior standing.
  
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    SOCI 412 - Slavery and Human Trafficking: Past and Present 3 hours


    This course explores how slavery and the traffic of human beings have been justified, organized and practiced in different cultures and at different times. Focusing on several world regions (Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and the Americas), and covering both historical and contemporary forms of slavery, the course uses anthropological perspectives to examine definitions and representations of slavery, as well as the economic, political and social forces that shape human exploitation cross-culturally. Course meets Multicultural graduation requirement. Cross-listed as ANTH 412 . Prerequisite: junior standing.
  
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    SOCI 421 - Class, Status, and Power 3 hours


    Emphasis on social stratification systems and social inequalities, including the areas of economic class, ethnicity, gender and sexuality. Analysis of theories of power in constructing and maintaining systems of social inequality; the creation of wealth and poverty in the U.S. and globally; sources and consequences of ethnic and gender inequalities; and the stratification system surrounding sexualities. Prerequisite: junior standing.
  
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    SOCI 433 - Topics 1-3 hours


    Specialized inquiry into a defined concept, topic, theory or application in sociology. Topics are approved by the Psychology and Sociology Department.
  
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    SOCI 455 - Directed Study 1-3 hours


    Individual research project covering a limited and well-focused aspect of theory, concept or application in a selected area of sociology. This course requires the approval of the chair of the Psychology and Sociology Department  and is available on the main campus only. Prerequisites: completion of at least 45 semester hours of coursework, prior completion of at least 6 semester hours of psychology courses, and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  
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    SOCI 456 - Directed Study 1-3 hours


  
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    SOCI 457 - Directed Study 1-3 hours


    Individual research project covering a limited and well-focused aspect of theory, concept or application in a selected area of sociology. This course requires the approval of the chair of the Psychology and Sociology Department  and is available on the main campus only. Prerequisites: completion of at least 45 semester hours of coursework, prior completion of at least 6 semester hours of psychology courses, and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  
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    SOCI 460 - Classical Social Theory 3 hours


    Reinforcement of major schools of thought in sociology from the Enlightenment through World War II. Emphasis on theoretical thinking in sociology and analysis of the underlying principles and major works of Comte, Marx, Spencer, Weber, Durkheim, Simmel,  Martineau, Perkins Gilman, Du Bois, Mead, The Frankfurt School, Parsons. Prerequisite: junior standing.
  
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    SOCI 470 - Contemporary Social Theory 3 hours


    Survey of contemporary social theory, beginning in post- World War II era through the current era of poststructuralism, feminist sociology, critical race theory and queer theory. Includes the study of C. Wright Mills, Jurgen Habermas, Pierre Bourdieu, Immanual Wallerstein, Anthony Giddens, Michel Foucault, Theda Skocpol, Dorothy Smith, Adrienne Rich and Patricia Hill Collins. Prerequisite: junior standing.
  
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    SOCI 485 - Feminist Theory and Methodology 3 hours


    This course analyzes the intellectual debate feminism has inspired in academia. Analyzes the specific contributions of feminist researchers across the disciplines, specifically focusing on feminist methods of inquiry, challenges to the traditional science model, dilemmas of feminist research, and feminist theoretical contributions. Standpoint theory, research reflexivity, and questions of objectivity and subjectivity are among the topics covered. Cross-listed as WMST 485 . Prerequisite: junior standing.
  
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    SOCI 495 - Integrative Seminar 3 hours


    Culminating experience for the major. A capstone course to apply prior learning to probing major areas of research in sociology. Prerequisites: senior standing; Sociology major; SOCI 111 , SOCI 224  and SOCI 327 .
  
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    SOCI 499 - Internship 1-3 hours


    Involves the application of the student’s sociological knowledge and skills in an actual work environment under supervision. Sociology instructor’s and field supervisor’s permission must be obtained one semester prior to internship. Prerequisites: sociology major, senior standing, 3.0 or higher GPA in Sociology courses.

Spanish (SPAN)

  
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    SPAN 101 - Elementary Spanish I 3 hours


    Spanish 101 emphasizes elementary proficiency in listening, oral expression, and reading and writing of Spanish, as well as basic understanding of Spanish speaking cultures.
  
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    SPAN 102 - Elementary Spanish II 3 hours


    Spanish 102 is a direct continuation of Spanish 101 with further development of the four language skills and continued introduction to Spanish speaking cultures. Prerequisite: SPAN 101  with a grade of C or higher, or two years (four semesters) of high school Spanish. Not open to native speakers.
  
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    SPAN 103 - Elementary Spanish III 3 hours


    Spanish 103 reinforces and expands the skills of listening comprehension, oral expression, reading, writing and cross-cultural understanding. Prerequisite: SPAN 102  with a grade of C or higher, or four years (eight semesters) of high school Spanish. Not open to native speakers.
  
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    SPAN 104 - Elementary Spanish IV 3 hours


    Spanish 104 focuses on advanced Spanish grammar, conversation and composition, as well as the exploration of the cultures of Spanish-speaking countries based on selected readings. The class is taught in Spanish. Emphasis is on conversation, writing, and reading. Prerequisite: SPAN 103  with a grade of C or higher. Not open to native speakers.
  
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    SPAN 110 - Spanish for Medical Personnel 3 hours


    Introduction to Spanish grammar with emphasis on basic communication; vocabulary for hospital use; knowledge of cultural characteristics of Spanish-speaking groups within the U.S. Occasional offering.
  
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    SPAN 111 - Spanish for Law Enforcement Personnel 3 hours


    Introduction to Spanish grammar for basic communication; emphasis on law enforcement terminology, legal instructions. Introduction to cultural characteristics and heritage of Spanish-speaking groups within the U.S.
  
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    SPAN 112 - Spanish for Social-Service Workers 3 hours


    Introduction to Spanish grammar with emphasis on basic communication; vocabulary emphasizes social problems; government aid to the disadvantaged, medical health, diet and problems of consumers.
  
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    SPAN 203 - Spanish Conversation I 3 hours


    Conversational Spanish using cultural-based materials and readings emphasizing the four skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing, as well as a review of elementary and intermediate Spanish-level grammatical points. Prerequisite: SPAN 104  with a grade of C or higher.
  
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    SPAN 204 - Spanish Composition/Conversation and Culture 3 hours


    Oral and written composition; review of more difficult grammatical constructions and idioms. Oral practice in everyday Spanish, discussion, idiomatic usage, listening, comprehension, speaking, as well as the introduction of elementary-level Spanish-American and Peninsular literature. Prerequisite: SPAN 104  with a grade of C or higher.
  
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    SPAN 255 - Directed Study 1-3 hours


    Individual research project covering a limited and well-focused aspect of theory, concept or application in a selected area of Spanish. This course requires the approval of the chair of the Language and Communication Studies Department and is available on the main campus only. Prerequisites: completion of at least 45 semester hours of coursework, prior completion of at least 6 semester hours of English courses, and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  
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    SPAN 305 - Advanced Spanish Conversation and Composition 3 hours


    Intensive study of comprehension, pronunciation and grammar, with brief written compositions and oral dialogues. Prerequisite: SPAN 102 .
  
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    SPAN 306 - Commercial Spanish 3 hours


    Composition of Spanish business correspondence; translating technical writing and commercial documents; documentary credits; international business transactions. Prerequisite: SPAN 305 .
  
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    SPAN 499 - Internship 1-12 hours


    Qualified students have the opportunity to work during the summer months in an international trade setting.

Study Abroad (COLL)

  
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    COLL 177 - Study Tour Experiences 1 hour


    Short term study abroad experience.
  
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    COLL 180 - Introduction to Study Abroad: Orientation and Cultural Preparation 1 hour


    This eight-week course is designed to introduce students to various study abroad countries, cultures, and programs offered at Columbia College. This course will help students with logistical procedures that include the application process, finances, immigration policies and travel preparation. Other topics the course will cover are geared towards helping students become culturally competent and successful students abroad.  By the end of the course, students will have a stronger understanding of how to deal with issues such as culture shock, stereotypes, and varying communication styles.
  
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    COLL 277 - Study Tour Experiences 1-3 hours


    Short term study abroad experiences. Subject matter will vary within the department’s field of study. Prerequisite: determined by instructor. Course may be repeated.
  
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    COLL 377 - Study Tour Experiences 1-3 hours


    Short term study abroad experiences. Subject matter will vary within the department’s field of study. Prerequisite: determined by instructor. Course may be repeated.
  
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    COLL 477 - Study Tour Experiences 1-3 hours


    Short term study abroad experiences. Subject matter will vary within the department’s field of study. Prerequisite: determined by instructor. Course may be repeated.

Women’s Studies (WMST)

  
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    WMST 210 - The Sociology of Gender 3 hours


    Critical examination of gender as a social construct. The role of gender in socialization, sexuality, family, religion, work, the mass media, education and politics. Cross-listed as SOCI 210 .
  
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    WMST 310 - Women and Society 3 hours


    Analysis of the social and cultural forces that shape women’s position in society; explanations and critical analysis of the gendered nature of our reality. Cross-listed as WMST 310 .
  
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    WMST 322W - Women and Gender in World History 3 hours


    This course examines the history of women around the globe from 1500 to present. This course examines gender as a system of power relations that has been integral to the shaping of national and international politics and public policy and to the development of national and international economies. The class explores the meaning of women’s status across continents, cultures and historical periods; examines how women have attempted to define, maintain, or gain power in changing historical circumstances; identifies common dilemmas and struggles faced by women; and considers how changing definitions of gender have intersected with ideas about race and ethnicity throughout world history. Cross-listed as HIST 322W . Prerequisite: Junior standing and ENGL 133W .
  
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    WMST 336 - Gender and Globalization 3 hours


    Critical analysis of the history and discourse surrounding globalization, with special emphasis on its gendered effect. Attention is paid to the often invisible micro macro connections between individual lives across the globe. The distribution of power and its impact on development processes is examined. The impact of gender dynamics within social institutions: economic, political, and cultural are also examined. Course meets Multicultural graduation requirement. Cross-listed as ANTH 336 /SOCI 336 . Prerequisite: Junior standing.

     

  
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    WMST 343W - Gender Communication 3 hours


    Examination of the significant role of gender in human communication behaviors as enacted in social spaces of daily life. Cross-listed as COMM 343W . Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and ENGL 133W .
  
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    WMST 373W - Women and Gender in American History 3 hours


    This course examines the history of women in the United States from the colonial era to the present. This course examines gender as a system of power relations that has been integral to the shaping of American politics and public policy and to the development of the American economy. The class explores the meaning of women’s status across cultures and historical periods; examines how women have attempted to define, maintain, or gain power in changing historical circumstances; identifies common dilemmas and struggles faced by women; and considers how changing definitions of gender have intersected with ideas about race and ethnicity throughout American history. Cross-listed as HIST 373W  . Prerequisites: ENGL 133W .
  
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    WMST 388W - Fashion and Society 3 hours


    Critical examination of fashion as an institution, shaping individual choices, and communicating social values and norms. Attention is paid to how fashion serves as a tool for individual expression and as a way to showcase social affiliation. Fashion is analyzed as both an art form and as a powerful industry. Topics include: Art and industry; Body; Consumerism; Dressing in modern society; Global style; Individual and group identity; Inequality; Social movements; Trends. Cross-listed as SOCI 388W . Prerequisite: ENGL 133W 
  
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    WMST 485 - Feminist Theory and Methodology 3 hours


    This course analyzes the intellectual debate feminism has inspired in academia, analyzes the specific contributions of feminist researchers across the disciplines, specifically focusing on feminist methods of inquiry, challenges to the traditional science model, dilemmas of feminist research, and feminist theoretical contributions. Standpoint theory, research reflexivity, and questions of objectivity and subjectivity are among the topics covered. Cross-listed as SOCI 485 . Prerequisite: junior standing.
 

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