Oct 03, 2022  
Undergraduate Catalog 2019-2020 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2019-2020 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

History (HIST)

  
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    HIST 337 - Fascism in Europe, 1900-1945 3 hours


    Explores how and why fascist groups achieved power in European states during the early 20th century. Topics include political mobilization, social engineering, resistance and collaboration, racism/anti-Semitism, and gender policies, foreign policy, imperial aims and mass violence. The course concludes by exploring the legacies fascists left behind for Europe and the world. Prerequisite: HIST 102  or HIST 112 .
  
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    HIST 339W - History of Modern Africa 3 hours


    This course offers a history of Africa from the early nineteenth century to the present day. The course examines the European imperial scramble to colonize Africa during the later 1800s and early 1900s, the broader integration of African societies into the world economy during that process, the social, political and cultural impact of imperial policies, Western popular images of Africa in the colonial period, the nationalist struggles that resulted in the independent African states, and the achievements of - and persistent problems faced by - those post-colonial states. Cross-listed as ANTH 339W . Prerequisite: HIST 102  or HIST 112  and ENGL 133W .
  
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    HIST 342W - American Civil War 3 hours


    Analysis of the American Civil War during the nineteenth century. The course assesses the causes and the consequences of the sectional conflict between the North and the South. In particular, it examines the role of chattel slavery, the crisis of the federal Constitution, the campaigns of the Union and Confederate forces, and the plans for postwar reconstruction. Furthermore, significant themes of politics, labor, gender, and violence will be considered. Prerequisites: Any 3 hours of HIST and ENGL 133W .
  
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    HIST 347W - World War I 3 hours


    Analysis of the causes and consequences of the First World War from a transnational perspective. This course examines the major events of the armed conflict from 1914 to 1918 while featuring the remembrances of men and women around the globe. The impact of “total war” on modernity will be considered, as will the geopolitical re-alignment of the post-war world. 

    Prerequisites: Any 3 hours of a HIST course, ENGL 133W .

  
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    HIST 348W - World War II 3 hours


    Analysis of the causes and consequences of the Second World War from a transnational perspective.  This course examines the major events of the armed conflict from 1937 to 1945 while featuring the remembrances of combatants and non-combatants in Europe and Asia.  The impact of “total war” on modernity will be considered, as will the geopolitical re-alignment of the post-war world. Prerequisite: Any 3 hours of HIST and ENGL 133W  .
  
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    HIST 350W - American Revolution 3 hours


    Analysis of the American Revolution during the eighteenth century. This course considers the causes and the consequences of the colonial rebellion against the British Empire in North America. In particular, it focuses upon the cultural, economic, military, and constitutional issues shaping the struggle for independence. Significant attention will be given to the clash of values, interests, arms, and ambitions that established the United States by 1789. Prerequisites: Any 3 hours of HIST and ENGL 133W  .
  
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    HIST 352W - American Environmental History 3 hours


    Analysis of America’s environmental history from the colonial period to the present.  This course considers the interrelationships between human society and the natural world in different bioregions of North America, focusing upon how ideas, institutions, and technologies have evolved over time.  It traces American Indian ecology, agricultural land use, natural resource conservation, and recent environmental activism.  It offers special attention to the significance of wilderness in the American past. Cross-listed as ENVS 352W . Prerequisite: Junior standing and ENGL 133W .
  
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    HIST 353W - Missouri History 3 hours


    Survey of Missouri’s history from colonization to the present. This course examines the contributions of Missouri and its inhabitants to the development of the U.S. In particular, it will highlight the state’s government over the years. Prerequisites: Any 3 hours of a HIST course.
  
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    HIST 358 - The Making of Modern Britain 3 hours


    Exploration of the most important social, economic and political developments in Britain since the beginning of the 18th century covers topics including the rise of industrial society, Victorian ideas and attitudes, British feminism, the rise and fall of the British Empire, the emergence of the Labour Party and British socialism, the impact of the two world wars and postwar political and social changes. Certain themes are stressed, such as the relationship between elite and popular politics, the development of the state, changing configurations of empire, and transformations in social and gender relations. Prerequisite: HIST 102  or HIST 112 .
  
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    HIST 359 - The Rise and Fall of the British Empire 3 hours


    This course traces the emergence of an England-centered empire, which from the 1600s to the near-present facilitated a vast and violent movement of goods, peoples, technologies, diseases, cultural artifacts, and cultural practices.  Attention is paid to issues of negotiation, domination and resistance; the effects of gender across cultures; politicization, identity formation, and nationalism; the complications and uses of race; and the empire’s effects on Britain.  Prerequisite: HIST 102 or HIST 112.
  
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    HIST 362 - History of the American West 3 hours


    Analysis of Western America from colonization to the present. The course traces the imperial, commercial, intellectual and social relationships constituting the trans-Mississippi region. In particular, it appraises the interactions of diverse populations in a frontier borderland over the course of several generations. Furthermore, significant attention is given to territorial acquisition, population mobility, economic development and popular culture. Prerequisite: junior standing.
  
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    HIST 370W - American Military History 3 hours


    Analysis of the military history of the United States from the colonial period to the present.  This course considers the role and use of armed forces in relation to the social, cultural, political, economic, and technological development of the United States.  It will not only address such themes as wartime strategy, operational tactics, and combat technology, but also the impact of warfare on society and on the remembrances of ordinary men and women in uniform.  Significant attention will be given to the evolution of civil-military relations, the advent of professionalism in the military, the non-military uses of the military, and the military’s role as a tool for global power. Prerequisites: Any 3 hours of HIST and ENGL 133W .
  
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    HIST 371 - History of American Business 3 hours


    Analysis of American business from the colonial period to the present. The course traces the entrepreneurial adventures of small as well as large firms.  It will focus upon economic processes that created a modern industrial order, wherein corporations assumed a dominant position in the development of the United States. Significant attention will be given to key leaders of the free enterprise system. Cross-listed as MGMT 371 . Prerequisite: junior standing.
  
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    HIST 372W - Native American History 3 hours


    Analysis of Native American history from prehistory to the present. The course considers the integrity and viability of indigenous societies in North America, the dynamic process of cultural persistence and change, and the clash of cultures that began with European conquest. In particular, it traces the formation and operation of U.S. government policy toward the “first peoples” over the course of generations. Particular attention will be given to the pre-contact traditions, survival strategies, and tribal sovereignty exemplified by native communities in the U.S. Prerequisites: Any 3 hours of HIST and ENGL 133W .
  
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    HIST 373W - Women and Gender in American History 3 hours


    This course examines the history of women in the United States from the colonial era to the present. This course examines gender as a system of power relations that has been integral to the shaping of American politics and public policy, and to the development of the American economy. The class explores the meaning of women’s status across cultures and historical periods; examines how women have attempted to define, maintain, or gain power in changing historical circumstances; identifies common dilemmas and struggles faced by women; and considers how changing definitions of gender have intersected with ideas about race and ethnicity throughout American history. Cross-listed as WMST 373W . Prerequisite: Junior standing and ENGL 133W 
  
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    HIST 374W - African American History 3 hours


    This course explores the major themes in African American history, from its roots in 15th-century West Africa to contemporary U.S. society. Course materials cover the major political, economic, social and cultural factors that have shaped the African and African American experience in the United States. Prerequisite: Junior standing and ENGL 133W  .
  
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    HIST 381 - History of Christianity: Early Church 3 hours


    Development of Christianity from its origins to the eve of the Reformation. Emphasis is on the evolution of theology within the context of Western civilization. Specific subjects include ancient Hebrew thought, Hellenism, gnosticism, the historical Jesus, the Trinity, Augustine, medieval theology, heresies, etc. Cross-listed as RELI 381 . Prerequisite: HIST 101  or HIST 111 .
  
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    HIST 382 - Christianity in the Modern World 3 hours


    Development of Christian thought from the late Middle Ages to the present. Emphasis is on the confrontation of Christian theology with modernity. Specific subjects are: the Reformation, Counter-Reformation, the scientific revolution, the Enlightenment, Liberal Theology, the Theology of Crisis, etc. Cross-listed as RELI 382 Prerequisite: HIST 102  or HIST 112  .
  
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    HIST 392 - History of Russia 1825 to Present 3 hours


    Major historical developments from the death of Alexander I through the coming of Marxism, the Revolution of 1917, Stalin, the Great Patriotic War, the Cold War, to the Commonwealth of Independent States. Prerequisite: junior standing.
  
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    HIST 399 - History Internship 1-12 hours


    Students complete 45 hours of experiential work for each semester hour. Students typically work at an historical society, archive, historical site or similar agency or organization. The directing faculty member must approve the internship placement. Grades are assigned as S (Satisfactory) or U (Unsatisfactory). Students may register for no more than 12 history internship credits (HIST 399 and HIST 499  combined) during their time at Columbia College. The seminar is the culminating experience for graduation as a history major. Completion with a grade of C or higher required. Prerequisites: three hours of history credit; junior standing; minimum 2.5 cumulative GPA at time of registration of internship.
  
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    HIST 494 - Senior Seminar in History 3 hours


    The culminating seminar for graduation as a History major. Historical Research and Methods is a seminar dedicated to the research and writing of a senior thesis. All participants are expected to apply the techniques of scholarship as generally accepted by the historical profession. The seminar is the culminating experience for graduation as a history major. Completion with grade of C or higher is required. Prerequisites: HIST 121 ; HIST 122 ; HIST 101  or HIST 111 ; HIST 102  or HIST 112 ; HIST 294  and nine hours of HIST electives at the 300 or 400 level.
  
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    HIST 499 - Advanced History Internship 1-12 hours


    Students complete 45 hours of experiential work for each semester hour. Students typically work at an historical society, archive, historical site or similar agency or organization. The directing faculty member must approve the internship placement. Grades are assigned as S (Satisfactory) or U (Unsatisfactory). Students may register for no more than 12 history internship credits (HIST 399  and HIST 499 combined) during their time at Columbia College. Prerequisites: minimum nine hours of history coursework; Senior standing; minimum 3.0 GPA in major core classes at time of registration for internship.

Honors (HNRS)

  
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    HNRS 310 - Honors Service 1 hour


    All students participating in the Honors Program must complete this course prior to graduation. Students must design a community service activity, choose a professor to direct that activity, and perform the project. Requires 45 hours of service activity. Prerequisite: eligibility for Honors Program.
  
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    HNRS 340 - Schiffman Ethics in Society Lecture 3 hours


    Each year a renowned scholar or public figure is invited to the main campus to speak on the role of ethics in society. This course is a careful review of the writings by this year’s speaker as well as an investigation of the literature surrounding the topic of the guest’s presentation. Prerequisite: eligibility for Honors Program. May be repeated.
  
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    HNRS 350 - Topics 3 hours


    An investigation of some great idea or ideas in the liberal arts and sciences, a focus on an epoch or trend in cultural history, an in-depth study of an alternative culture or a myopic biography. Examples: Beauty, Chaos Theory, Evolution & Fundamentalism, The Civil Rights Movement, What Are Numbers?, theories of humor, redefining photographic truth, etc. Prerequisite: eligibility for Honors Program. May be repeated.
  
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    HNRS 484 - Honors 3 hours


    Open to students who have been accepted as candidates for degrees with Distinction and who are registering for their final semester of coursework. Prerequisite: admittance to the Honors Program required.

Human Services (HUMS)

  
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    HUMS 105 - Introduction to Human Services 3 hours


    Introduction to the profession, practice and career options of human services.
  
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    HUMS 300 - Exploring Research 3 hours


    Finding, understanding, critical analysis and communication of empirically based research for practice application. Prerequisite: MATH 150  or MATH 170 .
  
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    HUMS 305 - Foundations of Counseling 3 hours


    Counseling theories and methods for working with individuals. This course is a practice class, and there is much role-play in the classroom to practice new skills. Prerequisites: HUMS 105 , sophomore standing.
  
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    HUMS 310 - Military Case Work 3 hours


    Examination of the unique challenges and opportunities facing veterans, active duty military and their families. Topics include programs and services specific to these populations. Prerequisite:  sophomore standing.
  
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    HUMS 325 - Case Management 3 hours


    Introduction to case management theory, models of case management and skills necessary to function effectively as case managers. Content includes the use and case management implications of psychotropic medications. Students develop abilities to serve special populations in a case management role. Prerequisite/Corequisite: HUMS 105  or PSYC 101 .
  
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    HUMS 330 - Ethics in the Human Services Profession 3 hours


    Study of ethical practice as it relates to the field of human services. Core ethics, ethical decision making, and ethical dilemmas are discussed. Prerequisites: HUMS 105 ​, junior standing and HUMS major. 
  
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    HUMS 333 - Topics 3 hours


    Specialized inquiry into a defined concept, topic, theory or application in human services. Topics are approved by the Criminal Justice Administration and Human Services Department.
  
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    HUMS 335 - Working with Groups 3 hours


    Theoretical foundations, knowledge, values and skills of human service practice as they apply to working with groups. Prerequisite: HUMS 105  or PSYC 101 .
  
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    HUMS 340 - Working with Families 3 hours


    Examination of family function and assessment using the major models, theories and perspectives of family and family therapy. Students learn how to apply those theories and perspectives to assess families in conjunction with other assessment tools such as ecomaps and genograms. Prerequisite: HUMS 105  or PSYC 101  (courses may be taken as corequisite).
  
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    HUMS 345 - Working with Communities and Organizations 3 hours


    The values, knowledge and skills of human service practice in the context of communities and organizations. Prerequisite: HUMS 105  or PSYC 101  (courses may be taken as corequisite).
  
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    HUMS 350 - Social Gerontology 3 hours


    Social, psychological and physical aspects of aging, including the consequences of the societal demographic shifts toward an increasingly aged society. Investigates the research on death and dying and the role of the elderly in our society. Additionally, generates an understanding of the theoretical perspectives on aging. Cross-listed as SOCI 350 .Prerequisite: junior standing.
  
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    HUMS 356 - Directed Study


    Individual research project covering a limited and well-focused aspect of theory, concept or application in a selected area of human services. This course requires the approval of the chair of the Criminal Justice Administration and Human Services Department and is available on the main campus only. Prerequisites: completion of at least 45 semester hours of coursework, prior completion of at least 6 semester hours of human services courses, and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  
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    HUMS 365 - American Social Policy 3 hours


    Emphasis on the nature and development of American social policy, including the history of current structures of social welfare services, the role of policy in service delivery and analyses of current social policy issues including family policy, health care policy, drug policy, tax policy, and other topical issues. Cross-listed as SOCI 365 Prerequisite: junior standing.
  
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    HUMS 375 - Disabilities 3 hours


    Examination of issues faced by persons with disabilities and the social injustice which they have historically experienced. Different theories or approaches used to understand the situation of persons with disabilities are examined. Particular issues and areas of need experienced by individuals having different types of disabilities (mobility, sensory, cognitive, etc.) are explored. It considers the consequences and dynamics of systemic barriers that threaten to compromise or exclude the participation of persons with disabilities in social, economic, and political processes. Various perspectives on equality are explored from the point of view of their impact on this vulnerable population. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.
  
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    HUMS 380 - Addiction 3 hours


    Examination of substance use and the progressive nature of addiction. An overview of the pharmacological effects of drugs within major drug categories, theories of addiction, treatment methods and prevention are examined. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
  
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    HUMS 385 - Mental Health 3 hours


    This course provides a look at mental health problems from a diagnostic perspective. Students learn diagnostic criteria for mental health disorders, psychotropic medications and the role of  the family. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 , sophomore standing.
  
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    HUMS 390 - Child Welfare 3 hours


    This course begins with an historical overview of child welfare services in American society, establishes a framework for both policy and practice, and examines current trends in the field of child welfare. Special emphasis is placed on evaluating the needs of high-risk populations of children/youth and families. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.
  
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    HUMS 455 - Directed Study


    Individual research project covering a limited and well-focused aspect of theory, concept or application in a selected area of human services. This course requires the approval of the chair of the Criminal Justice Administration and Human Services Department and is available on the main campus only. Prerequisites: completion of at least 45 semester hours of coursework, prior completion of at least 6 semester hours of human services courses, and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  
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    HUMS 495 - Senior Seminar 3 hours


    Required as a culminating experience prior to graduation. Capstone course integrating prior learning while exploring current research, contemporary issues and areas of practice in human services. Grade of C or higher is required. Writing intensive. Emphases include exploration of self and creating expertise within an area of interest pertinent to the career and academic goals of the student. Prerequisites: Human Services major, senior standing and all core requirements completed (or concurrently enrolled). May be taken concurrently with HUMS 499 .
  
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    HUMS 499 - Internship 3-6 hours


    Students complete 45 hours of experiential work for each credit hour. Students typically work in a non-profit social service agency under the direct supervision of a designated agency employee.  Grades are assigned as S (satisfactory) or U (unsatisfactory). A monthly seminar examines professional and developmental issues related to the experience and assists students in integrating the knowledge, values and skills of practice in the human services field. Prerequisites: Senior standing; HUMS 495  taken previously or concurrently; completion of all HUMS core requirements; and a minimum of 2.5 cumulative GPA at time of registration of internship. Students may register for 3 or 6 credits.

Japanese (JAPA)

  
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    JAPA 101 - Beginning Japanese I 3 hours


    JAPA 101 emphasizes elementary proficiency in listening comprehension, oral expression, reading, writing and cultural understanding. Prerequisite: Not open to native speakers or students who have had three or more years of high school Japanese.
  
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    JAPA 102 - Beginning Japanese II 3 hours


    Continuation of JAPA 101 , with further development of language skills and cultural understanding. Prerequisite: JAPA 101  with a grade of C or higher or three years of high school Japanese. Not open to native speakers or students who have had four years of high school Japanese.
  
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    JAPA 103 - Intermediate Japanese I 3 hours


    Continuation of JAPA 102, with further development of language skills and cultural understanding. Not open to native speakers. Prerequisite: JAPA 102  with a grade of C or higher or three years of high school Japanese.
  
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    JAPA 104 - Intermediate Japanese II 3 hours


    Continuation of JAPA 103, with further development of language skills and cultural understanding. Not open to native speakers. Prerequisite: JAPA 103  with a grade of C or higher or three years of high school Japanese.

Leadership (LEAD)

  
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    LEAD 200 - Introduction to Leadership Concepts 3 hours


    An examination of the theory, evolution, practice and dynamics for leadership in contemporary society.
  
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    LEAD 499 - Applied Leadership Internship 3 hours


    Students complete 45 hours of experiential work for each credit hour. Students work in conjunction with a faculty sponsor on approved learning goals. The directing faculty member must approve the internship placement. Grades are assigned as S (Satisfactory) or U (Unsatisfactory). Students completing any major may earn credit from an approved internship that involves applied leadership. In addition, earned credit from ELI, Mock Trial, Model UN, or appropriate MSCI, ASCI, and NSCI experiences is acceptable. Prerequisites: senior standing, minimum 3.0 GPA in major core classes at time of registration for internship. Internship must be in same department as student’s major.

Legal Studies (LGST)

  
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    LGST 301 - Alternative Dispute Resolution 3 hours


    Examination of negotiation, mediation and arbitration as alternatives to the formal trial process in resolving legal disputes. Prerequisite: junior standing.

Management (MGMT)

  
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    MGMT 150 - Introduction to Business 3 hours


    Comprehensive survey of the major areas of business and its environment. Concepts, issues and vocabulary are emphasized.
  
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    MGMT 152 - Business Mathematics 3 hours


    Development of an understanding of and skill in using arithmetic calculations in business-oriented problems.
  
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    MGMT 230 - Principles of Management 3 hours


    Survey of principles of management. Familiarity with the history and evolution of the field and with modern principles and their application.
  
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    MGMT 233 - Topics 1-3 hours


    Specialized inquiry into topics not covered in the curriculum.
  
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    MGMT 254 - Business Communication 3 hours


    Development of written, oral and interpersonal skills for effective communication in the business world. Emphasis on clear, effective business correspondence, improved interpersonal skills and public speaking. Students learn appropriate real-world skills and strategies to increase their abilities to use this knowledge. Prerequisite: ENGL 133W .
  
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    MGMT 261 - Introduction to Human Resource Management 3 hours


    This is a foundational course introducing students to the functional areas of Human Resource Management and the competencies needed to be a successful Human Resources professional. Prerequisite: MGMT 230 .
  
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    MGMT 265 - Business Law I 3 hours


    Fundamental principles of law relating to business activity. Use of cases. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.
  
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    MGMT 278 - Introductory Business Analytics 3 hours


    Provides a framework that enables students to recognize, understand and apply the language, theory and models of the field of business analytics. Cross-listed as ACCT 278 . Prerequisite: Beginning knowledge of Excel 2016, Word 2016.
  
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    MGMT 300 - The American Healthcare System 3 hours


    A study of the evolution of the healthcare system in the United States and characteristics of the current system.
  
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    MGMT 311 - Public Administration and Policy 3 hours


    Examination of growth, structure, role, methods, and policy of the national bureaucracy and its role in American government and society. Cross-listed as PADM 311 /POSC 311 .Prerequisite: POSC 111 .
  
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    MGMT 315 - Comparative Healthcare Systems 3 hours


    A study of various healthcare systems in practice, throughout countries in the industrialized world, will be examined. This includes how health care systems are influenced by culture, and the religious and political philosophies of the regions/countries. Students will establish metrics for conducting quality comparisons across systems to evaluate pros and cons among the various systems.
  
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    MGMT 325 - Operations Management and Quality in Healthcare 3 hours


    A study of aspects of operations management specific to the healthcare industry.
  
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    MGMT 338 - International Business 3 hours


    Exploration of the challenges involved in multinational and international business. Course meets multicultural graduation requirement. Prerequisites: junior standing, MGMT 230 .
  
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    MGMT 339 - Diversity in Organizations 3 hours


    Successful inclusion is the outcome sought from good diversity management. Students will develop interpersonal skills needed to manage varying diverse work groups and the impact of cultural factors influencing behavior. Students will understand the business case for diversity leading to better problem solving. Prerequisite: MGMT 230 
  
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    MGMT 340 - Introduction to Healthcare Management 3 hours


    Introduction to fundamental healthcare management principles; issues and considerations unique to a healthcare setting that influence management decisions. Prerequisite: MGMT 230 .
  
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    MGMT 341 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship 3 hours


    The focus of this course is to explore the development of innovative thinking, opportunity recognition, and idea generation as it pertains to the creation of new businesses. Prerequisite: Junior Standing.
  
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    MGMT 345 - Intrapreneurship: Corporate Entrepreneurship 3 hours


    To sustain and grow in today’s hypercompetitive and global society, firms must practice continuous innovation. This course offers students the opportunity to study the process of creating and managing ventures within stable, possibly bureaucratic settings. Prerequisite: Junior standing.
  
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    MGMT 348 - International Business Law 3 hours


    This course will provide an overview of international rules, laws and regulations impacting business. This will include international law, international contracts and sales, international organizations, foreign trade, international marketing, international e-commerce, international labor and employment, and international intellectual property. Prerequisite: MGMT 265  Business Law.
  
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    MGMT 353 - Legal and Ethical Aspects of Healthcare 3 hours


    An overview of key laws and ethical issues that affect the delivery of health care. Prerequisites: MGMT 265 , MGMT 368W .
  
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    MGMT 354 - Public Relations Writing 3 hours


    The primary goal of the course is to help students develop the professional writing skills expected of beginning public relations practitioners, emphasizing the different approaches required for particular audiences and media. The course covers all forms of writing for public relations, including press releases, public service announcements, magazine queries, securing television and radio interviews, coverage memos, media alerts, features, trade press releases, newsletters, backgrounders, and public relations presentations. Prerequisites: MGMT 254 .
  
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    MGMT 360 - Organizational Theory 3 hours


    Examination of the foundations, theories, models, and literature for designing effective organizations. Extensive library research and case work required. Prerequisite: MGMT 230 .
  
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    MGMT 362 - Organizational Behavior 3 hours


    Provides a strong conceptual framework for understanding organizational efficiency as the result of the interactions of people and organizations. Prerequisite: MGMT 230  or PSYC 101 .
  
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    MGMT 363 - Operations Management 3 hours


    This course introduces students to the important functional area of operations management, in both manufacturing and service contexts. Prerequisite: MGMT 230 .
  
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    MGMT 364 - Recruitment, Staffing, and Performance Management 3 hours


    This course explores how organizations strategically plan for changes in their workforce. This includes identifying talent acquisition strategies and selection systems to identify the best talent for their businesses. Staffing planning strategies include forecasting, gap analysis, retention, and succession planning. Approaches to performance management consider criteria and types of measurement. Prerequisite: MGMT 261 
  
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    MGMT 365 - Compensation and Benefits 3 hours


    The focus of this course is “Total Compensation.” Direct and indirect compensation systems are evaluated to determine how organizations design the appropriate systems for their businesses. Topics include base pay systems, variable pay, executive compensation, benefit options, and government-mandated benefit. Prerequisite: MGMT 261 .
  
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    MGMT 367 - Business Law II 3 hours


    Continuation of Business Law I. Prerequisite: MGMT 265 .
  
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    MGMT 368W - Business Ethics 3 hours


    Analysis of principles used to evaluate ethical issues facing today’s business community as well as to formulate possible solutions. This course satisfies the General Education Ethics requirement for Business Administration, Management Information Systems and Computer Information Systems majors. Prerequisite: MGMT 230   and ENGL 133W .
  
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    MGMT 370 - Real Estate Negotiation 3 hours


    This course builds on concepts of conflict and negotiation as applied to a real estate setting. Advanced concepts explore foundational theories in an applied setting and the application of a variety of negotiation strategies and tactics. Prerequisite(s): ORGL 370  

     

  
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    MGMT 371 - History of American Business 3 hours


    Analysis of American business from the colonial period to the present. The course traces the entrepreneurial adventures of small as well as large firms. It focuses upon economic trends that created a modern industrial order, wherein the corporation assumed a dominant position in the U.S. Significant attention is given to key leaders of the free enterprise system. Cross-listed as HIST 371 . Prerequisite: junior standing.
  
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    MGMT 372 - Crisis Management 3 hours


    This course introduces students to the fundamental principles of effectively preventing and responding to crises in organizations. Students focus on the skills required for effective crisis management and to the processes engaged in crisis intervention. Crisis at both the individual and systems level are examined. Students learn protocols for conducting crisis audits and assessments and methods for action planning and implementation and post-crisis evaluation. Prerequisite: MGMT 230 .
  
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    MGMT 375 - Labor Relations 3 hours


    The focus of this course is learning about the labor relations process and the role of management and labor unions. Study of management approaches to collective labor agreements. Extensive study of negotiation, grievances and agreement administration. Prerequisite: MGMT 365 
  
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    MGMT 385 - Business Project Management 3 hours


    Whether one is a practitioner of project management or a participant in projects, understanding and applying project management skills and techniques is a fundamental need in today’s world.  This course address both managerial concepts and hands on application of software tools.  Emphasis is placed on the key knowledge areas that are recognized within the discipline:  project integration, scope, time, cost, quality, human resources, communication, stakeholder, risk and procurement management.  Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to apply project management techniques and use Microsoft Project to develop timelines, network diagrams and critical path analyses.  Examinations, assignments and/or projects will be used to demonstrate understanding of course objectives. Prerequisites: MGMT 230  and Junior Standing.
  
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    MGMT 390 - Real Estate Leadership Strategy Practicum 4 hours


    This real estate leadership strategy practicum integrates knowledge and skills from earlier courses in the Certificate in Real Estate Leadership as applied to professional experience through completion of a practicum project tied to a real organization. Students will apply concepts of leadership in a practical setting utilizing leadership theory and applied strategic tools. Prerequisite(s): FINC 397  , MGMT 230  , and completion of or concurrent enrollment in LEAD 200  and/or MGMT 362  .

     

  
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    MGMT 393 - Business Information Systems 3 hours


    Emphasis on management and technical concepts fundamental to business applications and management control of information systems. Coverage includes management information and decision support systems which aid in planning, organizing and controlling business activities. Prerequisites: ACCT 281 , CISS 170 , MGMT 230  (may be taken concurrently) and junior standing.
  
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    MGMT 395 - Real Estate Negotiation Strategy Practicum 4 hours


    his real estate negotiation strategy practicum integrates knowledge and skills from earlier courses in the Certificate in Real Estate Negotiation as applied to professional experience through completion of a practicum project tied to a real organization. The course will further explore the application of negotiation strategy and technique to create value in a given organization in the real estate industry.
    Prerequisite(s): FINC 397  , MGMT 230  , ORGL 370  and completion of or concurrent enrollment in MGMT 370  .

     

  
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    MGMT 399 - Management Internship 1-12 hours


    Internships in the Business Administration department provide academic field experience by combining theory and practice in a business setting.  Internship proposals must clearly demonstrate that the student will be engaged in a field experience that is directly related to his/her course of study, not engaged simply in a work experience. Internship opportunities are available in a broad range of organizations: public and private; large and small; profit and non-profit
  
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    MGMT 400 - Financial Management in Healthcare 3 hours


    An Examination of financial decisions and constraints unique to the healthcare industry. Cross-listed as FINC 400  . Prerequisite: FINC 350 .
  
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    MGMT 422 - Small Business Management 3 hours


    Students will learn about organizational structure, strategy development and management of a small business. They will create a business plan and learn how to pitch their plan to various types of stakeholders.  Prerequisite: MGMT 341 .
  
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    MGMT 430 - Management Science 3 hours


    Management Science is a discipline that integrates mathematical modeling and quantitative analysis into the managerial decision-making process. The goal of the course is to provide students with a background in mathematical modeling to augment their problem-solving skills. Prerequisites: MATH 150  or MATH 170 ; MATH 250  or PSYC 224 .
  
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    MGMT 433 - Topics 1-3 hours


    Specialized inquiry into topics not covered in the curriculum. 
  
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    MGMT 461 - Training and Development 3 hours


    Study of learning, training and development and the alignment with strategic goals of an organization for achieving goals and talent management. The course focuses on individual development, organizational development, and change management and performance management. This course explores the methods of identifying training needs, designing and implementing successful training programs and evaluating organizational training systems. Also, this course covers the process of planning and implementing interventions to create interpersonal, group, inter-group or organization-wide change. Prerequisite: MGMT 261 
  
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    MGMT 479 - Strategic Management 3 hours


    Culminating experience capstone course for majors in business administration. Requires case/report writing and the ability to integrate material from previous courses to analyze and resolve complex business strategic planning problems. Completion with a grade of C or higher required. Prerequisites: senior standing, completion of a minimum 33 hours of core requirements, including FINC 350 , and at least six hours of upper-level courses within the identified major.
  
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    MGMT 480 - Case Studies in Healthcare Management 3 hours


    Capstone Course for Healthcare Management Majors. Student will apply concepts learned throughout their program of study to case study scenarios. Prerequisites: MGMT 300  and MGMT 340 .
  
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    MGMT 490 - Strategic Human Resource Management 3 hours


    This is the capstone course for students completing the HR major. Students will understand the strategic role HR contributes to organizational objectives and complete a capstone project related to the functional areas of HR Management. Prerequisite: This course is taken upon completion of Business Core and HR Core curriculum.
  
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    MGMT 499 - Management Internship 1-3 hours



Marketing (MKTG)

  
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    MKTG 210 - Principles of Marketing 3 hours


    Survey of principles for providing value to consumers by segmenting and selecting target markets, assessing consumer needs, conducting marketing research, selling and servicing, and developing products and services all amidst the marketing environment.
  
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    MKTG 327 - Retail Management and Strategies 3 hours


    Development of policies, methods, and managerial strategies to accommodate the rapidly changing retail environment. Prerequisites: MGMT 150 , junior standing.
 

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