Oct 03, 2022  
Undergraduate Catalog 2019-2020 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2019-2020 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Marketing (MKTG)

  
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    MKTG 331 - Consumer Behavior 3 hours


    Introduction to individual and environmental determinants of the behavior of consumers. Use of knowledge of consumers’ behavior to plan, implement and control marketing activities. Prerequisite: MKTG 210 .
  
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    MKTG 332 - Public Relations 3 hours


    Policies, strategies and procedures available to an enterprise in establishing and controlling its communications with its many publics. Prerequisites: MKTG 210 .
  
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    MKTG 335 - Advertising and Sales Promotion 3 hours


    Study of marketing activities that stimulate consumer purchasing and dealer effectiveness. Emphasis on elements and process of developing effective advertising programs using integrated marketing communications. Prerequisite: MKTG 210 .
  
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    MKTG 352 - Strategic Sales and Customer Experience Management 3 hours


    This course overviews techniques and skills of strategic selling in various offline and online environments using varied approaches.  It also covers managing the customer experience function and honing service management skills in different environments.  Sales and Customer Service Management presentations required. Prerequisite: MKTG 210 .
  
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    MKTG 354 - Public Relations Writing 3 hours


    The primary goal of the course is to help students develop the professional writing skills expected of beginning public relations practitioners emphasizing the different approaches required for particular audiences and media. The course covers all forms of writing for public relations, including press releases, public service announcements, magazine queries, securing television and radio interviews, coverage memos, media alerts, features, trade press releases, newsletters, backgrounders, and public relations presentations. Prerequisite: MGMT 254 .
  
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    MKTG 360 - Digital Marketing 3 hours


    This course explores how the internet can be used effectively to strategically enhance the marketing activities of corporate enterprises, non-profits and government agencies. Prerequisite: MKTG 210 .
  
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    MKTG 370 - Social Media 3 hours


    The course researches, discusses, explores and demonstrates the ability to use emerging social media and marketing technologies for marketing and public relations uses within a for-profit or not-for-profit firm. Scholarly research writings from marketing and PR professional are reviewed and discussed. Students apply the online marketing and PR concepts in real time social media and marketing usage. Topics covered may include: blogs, Twitter, Facebook, wikis, podcasts, social bookmarking, RSS feeds, viral video, and other emerging web technologies. Introduction to individual and environmental determinants of the behavior of consumers. Use of knowledge of consumers’ behavior to plan, implement and control marketing activities. Prerequisite: MKTG 210 .
  
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    MKTG 378 - Marketing Communication Practicum 3 hours


    Students will conclude this course with a basic understanding of marketing design principles as well as practical skills in the areas of writing, photography, and video for marketing purposes. These real-world skills will give students the tools needed to create basic marketing communication materials in a marketing environment. Prerequisite: MKTG 210 .
  
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    MKTG 398 - Real Estate Digital Marketing Strategy Practicum 4 hours


    This real estate digital marketing strategy practicum integrates knowledge and skills from earlier courses in the Digital Marketing for Real Estate Certificate as applied to professional experience through completion of a practicum project tied to a real organization. Prerequisite(s): FINC 397  , MKTG 210  , and completion of or concurrent enrollment in MKTG 360  and/or MKTG 370  .

     

  
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    MKTG 399 - Marketing Internship 1-12 hours


    Internships in the Business Administration department provide academic field experience by combining theory and practice in a business setting.  Internship proposals must clearly demonstrate that the student will be engaged in a field experience that is directly related to his/her course of study, not engaged simply in a work experience. Internship opportunities are available in a broad range of organizations: public and private; large and small; profit and non-profit
  
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    MKTG 410 - Global Marketing 3 hours


    Survey of current international marketing strategy including the historical context of global marketing and current environmental issues and marketing management techniques. Course meets multicultural graduation requirements. Prerequisite: MKTG 210 .
  
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    MKTG 441 - Marketing Research and Analytics 3 hours


    This course will provide an understanding of how organizations can provide value by researching various aspects of the marketing environment using various data and sources. Prerequisites: MKTG 210  and MATH 250 .
  
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    MKTG 460 - Public Relations Campaigns 3 hours


    This is the capstone course for the Public Relations (PR) major. Students synthesize all that has been learned in prior marketing and public relations courses to develop a PR campaign for an actual client. This course is designed to help develop and refine critical thinking on the part of the student in selecting, creating and applying tools, techniques and principles of public relations to a variety of managerial cases and problem situations. Use of real-life case studies, tracking of current public relations issues, and creation of a full-scale public relations plan for an actual “client” are planned. This course is for those students close to graduation, who have mastered most or all of the skills courses and are ready to apply themselves to a genuine public relations problem. Prerequisite: MKTG 332 .
  
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    MKTG 478 - Strategic Marketing 3 hours


    Examination of the role of the marketing manager in analyzing, planning, implementing and controlling the marketing programs of an enterprise. Case work is used. Prerequisites: MKTG 210  and senior standing.
  
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    MKTG 480 - Sports and Event Marketing 3 hours


    Examination of the role of marketing in analyzing, planning, implementing and controlling the marketing programs of a sports enterprise. Prerequisite: MKTG 210 .
  
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    MKTG 499 - Marketing Internship 1-3 hours


    Internships in the Business Administration Department provide academic field experience by combining theory and practice in a business setting. Internship proposals must clearly demonstrate that the student will be engaged in a field experience that is directly related to their course of study, not engaged simply in a work experience. Internship opportunities are available in a broad range of organizations: public and private; large and small; profit and non-profit. Prerequisites:  senior standing, cumulative GPA 3.0 or higher, completed a minimum of 24 hours in core courses; completed a minimum of nine Columbia College upper-level hours in Business Administration courses.

Mathematics (MATH)

  
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    EDUC 102 - Teaching and Learning Elementary Mathematics from an Advanced Perspective 3 hours


    This course is designed to help preservice elementary school teachers develop a conceptual framework for mathematics, especially for those aspects normally experienced in elementary school. Through their work in the course the students study the main themes of mathematics throughout the curriculum, considering both mathematical and pedagogical content issues in teaching mathematics. Topics include sets, logic, informal geometry, numeration systems, properties of real numbers and an introduction to probability and statistics. Cross-listed as  MATH 102  . Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in MATH 104  , or higher MATH course; or a score of 19 or above on the math portion of the ACT; or 460 or above SAT score; or a passing score on the Columbia College math placement exam.
  
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    MATH 102 - Teaching and Learning Elementary Mathematics from an Advanced Perspective 3 hours


    This course is designed to help preservice elementary school teachers develop a conceptual framework for mathematics, especially for those aspects normally experienced in elementary school. Through their work in the course the students study the main themes of mathematics throughout the curriculum, considering both mathematical and pedagogical content issues in teaching mathematics. Topics include sets, logic, informal geometry, numeration systems, properties of real numbers and an introduction to probability and statistics. Cross-listed as EDUC 102 . Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in MATH 104 , or higher MATH course; or a score of 19 or above on the math portion of the ACT; or 460 or above SAT score; or a passing score on the Columbia College math placement exam.
  
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    MATH 104 - Beginning Algebra 3 hours


    Introduction to the fundamental concepts of algebra. Review of fractions, decimals and signed numbers. Methods for solving linear equations, linear inequalities, and systems of linear equations. Thorough treatment of graphing lines and linear equalities in the plane. Introduction to rules of exponents. Real-world applications are integrated throughout the course. Students must repeat the course if a grade of U, F, or D grade is awarded.
  
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    MATH 106 - Intermediate Algebra 3 hours


    Second course in a three-course sequence in algebra. Review of graphing lines. An introduction to solving systems of linear equations, exponents, polynomial expressions, square roots, zeros of polynomials, quadratic equations, and graphs of parabolas. Students must repeat the course if a U, F or D grade is awarded. Prerequisite: a passing score on the Columbia College math placement exam or MATH 104  with a grade of C or higher or a score of 19 or higher on the math portion of the ACT or 460 or above SAT score.
  
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    MATH 150 - College Algebra 3 hours


    Fundamental algebraic concepts are examined in the context of real world applications. Linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions are explored with emphasis on their numerical, graphical, and algebraic properties. Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in MATH 106  or a score of 21 or above on the math portion of the ACT (or if the ACT was taken before September 1989, a score of 20) or 500 or above SAT score, or a passing score on the Columbia College math placement exam.
  
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    MATH 155 - Algebraic Reasoning for Elementary and Middle School Teachers 3 hours


    This course introduces some basic concepts of number theory and modern algebra that underlie elementary and middle grade arithmetic and algebra, with a focus on collaborative learning and technology. Cross-listed as EDUC 155 . Prerequisites: MATH 102  and MATH 150  (or higher).
  
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    MATH 165 - Geometric Reasoning for Elementary and Middle School Teachers 3 hours


    This course introduces some basic concepts of geometric reasoning and measurements that underlie these concepts in elementary and middle school grades, with a focus on collaborative learning and technology. Prerequisites: MATH 102  and MATH 150  (or higher). Cross-listed with EDUC 165 .
  
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    MATH 170 - Finite Mathematics 3 hours


    This course presents a variety of applications of algebra to real-world problems and includes an introduction to set theory, probability and statistics. Topics include linear functions, systems of linear equations and inequalities, matrices, linear programming, basic counting and probability, and the mathematics of finance. Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in MATH 104  or higher level MATH course, or a score of 20 or above on the math portion of the ACT or a score of 480 or above on the math portion of SAT, or a passing grade on the Columbia College math placement exam.
  
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    MATH 180 - Precalculus 3 hours


    Precalculus is a preparatory course for calculus and covers the following topics: algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions; trigonometric equations and trigonometric identities. Prerequisite: grade of B or higher in MATH 150 , or a score of 24 or higher on the math portion of the ACT or 540 or higher SAT score or a passing score on the Columbia College math placement exam.
  
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    MATH 201 - Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 5 hours


    The first part of the three-part calculus series. Topics include: review of algebra and trigonometry; functions and limits; derivatives and their applications; the integrals and their applications. Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in MATH 180  or a score of 26 or higher on the math portion of the ACT or 590 or above SAT score or passing grade on the Columbia College math placement exam.
  
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    MATH 215 - Differential Calculus 3 hours


    First of a four-session sequence covering calculus and analytic geometry. Focus on functions, limits, and use of derivatives to solve practical problems. Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in MATH 180  or a score of 26 or higher on the math portion of the ACT or 590 or above SAT score.
  
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    MATH 222 - Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 5 hours


    The second part of the three-part calculus series. Transcendental functions, techniques of integration, improper integrals, infinite series and power series, parametrized curves and polar coordinates. Prerequisite: MATH 201  with grade of C or higher.
  
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    MATH 225 - Discrete Mathematics I 3 hours


    This course provides a foundation in formal mathematics and theorem-proving. Topics include functions, relations, sets, simple proof techniques, propositional logic, elementary number theory, the fundamentals of counting, recursion, and an introduction to algorithms. Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in MATH 201 .
  
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    MATH 226 - Integral Calculus I 3 hours


    Second course of a four-session sequence. Focus on the use of integrals to solve a variety of practical problems. Topics include derivatives of exponential, hyperbolic, trigonometric functions and partial derivatives. Prerequisite: MATH 215  with a grade of C or higher.
  
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    MATH 235 - Integral Calculus II 3 hours


    The third course in a three class calculus sequence. Topics include: Improper integrals, applications of integration, parametric equations and polar curves, series and sequences. Prerequisite:  MATH 226  with a grade of C or higher.
  
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    MATH 250 - Statistics I 3 hours


    Introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include collection of data, numerical and graphical descriptive methods, linear correlation and regression, probability concepts and distributions, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing for means and proportions. Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in MATH 104   or higher level MATH course, or a score of 20 or higher on the math portion of the ACT, or a score of 480 or higher on the math portion of the SAT, or a passing score on the Columbia College math placement exam. 
  
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    MATH 251 - Statistics II 3 hours


    This course is a continuation of Statistics I. Topics include hypothesis testing, regression, correlation, statistical decision theory, analysis of variance and nonparametric methods. Prerequisite: MATH 250 .
  
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    MATH 300 - Multivariate Calculus 3 hours


    Two and three dimensional vectors, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, line and surface integrals. Prerequisite: MATH 222  or MATH 235 .
  
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    MATH 303 - Linear Algebra 3 hours


    Vector spaces, linear transformations, matrices and determinants, with applications to systems of linear equations, geometry and other selected topics. Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in MATH 201 .
  
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    MATH 304 - Introduction to Abstract Algebra 3 hours


    Introduction to algebraic systems, their motivation, definitions and basic properties. Primary emphasis is on group theory (permutation and cyclic groups, subgroups, homomorphism, quotient groups) and is followed by a brief survey of rings, integral domains and fields. Prerequisites: grade of C or higher in both MATH 222  and MATH 225 .
  
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    MATH 305 - Number Theory 3 hours


    The goal of this course is to provide a modern treatment of number theory. The student learns more about integers and their properties, important number-theoretical ideas and their applications. The course emphasizes reading and writing proofs. Prerequisites: grade of C or higher in both MATH 222  and MATH 225 .
  
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    MATH 325 - Discrete Mathematics II 3 hours


    This course continues the discussion begun in Discrete Mathematics I (MATH 225 ) and serves to develop students’ understanding of the discrete mathematical concepts that underlie computer science. Topics in this second course include recurrence relations, graphs, paths and circuits, trees and optimization and matching theory. Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in MATH 225 .
  
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    MATH 330 - History of Mathematics 3 hours


    The goals of this course are to develop knowledge of the contributions made by mathematicians and the influence these contributions have made to the development of human thought and culture over time. The course provides a chronological tracing of mathematics from the ancient Chinese into modern times, with an emphasis on problems and the individuals who formulated and solved them. Course meets multicultural graduation requirement. Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in MATH 222 .
  
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    MATH 331 - Foundations of Geometry 3 hours


    This course provides students with the opportunity to broaden and deepen the understanding of Euclidean Geometry usually encountered in a high school geometry course. The course extends the geometric experience to non-Euclidean topics and serves to unify the study of geometry as the result of a system of axioms. Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in MATH 222 .
  
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    MATH 338 - Mathematical Statistics and Probability 3 hours


    A calculus-based introduction to statistical methods starting with basic probability, distribution theory, confidence intervals, hypothesis tests and sampling. Prerequisite: MATH 250  and MATH 222 ; or MATH 235 .
  
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    MATH 340 - Introduction to Probability Theory 3 hours


    Probability spaces; random variables and their distributions; repeated trials; probability limit theorem. Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in MATH 222 .
  
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    MATH 362 - Introduction to Automata Theory, Languages and Computation 3 hours


    The study of formal languages, grammars, abstract computer models, and computability. Different models of computation and their relationships with formal languages as well as capabilities and limitations of these models are studied from a theoretical perspective. Cross-listed as CISS 362 . Prerequisites: MATH 225  and CISS 240 .
  
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    MATH 370 - Differential Equations 3 hours


    Ordinary differential equations and systems with application to the sciences and engineering. Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in MATH 222  or MATH 235 .
  
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    MATH 371 - Introduction to Complex Variables 3 hours


    Introduction to the basic tools of the theory of complex variables, such as complex differentiation and the Cauchy-Rieman equations, analytic functions, complex series, complex contour integration, residues, poles and conformational mapping. Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in MATH 222 .
  
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    MATH 380 - Advanced Calculus 3 hours


    Rigorous development of some central ideas in analysis including limits, continuity and differentiability. Prerequisites: grade of C or higher in MATH 222  or MATH 235 ; and C or higher in MATH 225 .
  
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    MATH 399 - Math Teaching Internship 1-6 hours


    This course is recommended for those students who plan to attend graduate school or who plan to teach secondary school mathematics. Students complete 45 hours of experiential work for each credit hour. Students will assist full-time day faculty members in teaching any 100- or 200-level mathematics course. The directing faculty member must approve the internship placement and will determine the role the intern will play in the observed course. Grades are assigned as S (Satisfactory) or U (Unsatisfactory). Prerequisites: MATH 222  and MATH 225  with a grade of B or higher, Junior standing, minimum 3.0 GPA in major core classes at time of registration for internship. Students may register for no more than 6 mathematics internship credits during their time at Columbia College.
  
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    MATH 451 - Introduction to Cryptography and Computer Security 3 hours


    An introduction to cryptography and computer security. Topics include cryptographic methods, hash functions, key exchange, secure communication, message authentication, digital signatures, network security, system security, modern day security protocols and standards. Cross-listed as CISS 451 . Prerequisites: MATH 225 ; CISS 245  or CISS 243 .
  
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    MATH 493 - Senior Seminar in Mathematics for Teachers 3 hours


    A seminar course required as a culminating experience for mathematics majors who are seeking certification to teach at the elementary, middle or secondary levels. Students analyze problems from elementary, middle and high school mathematics from an advanced perspective and explicitly make connections between the concepts taught in elementary, middle and secondary and their more abstract analogues encountered in undergraduate mathematical courses. A grade of C or higher is required. Prerequisites: senior standing, admission to the Teacher Certification Program, EDUC 358  or EDUC 360  or EDUC 360 .
  
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    MATH 494 - Senior Seminar in Mathematics 3 hours


    A seminar course required as a culminating experience for mathematics majors. Students prepare and present a portfolio following departmental guidelines to document achievement of the learning goals for the mathematics major. Additionally, students present a lecture on a topic not covered in core courses in consultation with the instructor and take the Major Field Test for Mathematics. Grade of C or higher required. Prerequisite: senior standing.

Military Science (MSCI)

  
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    MSCI 1100 - Foundations of Officership 1 hour


    Introduces students to issues and competencies that are central to a commissioned officer’s responsibilities. Establish framework for understanding officership, leadership, and Army values followed and “life skills” such as physical fitness and time management.
  
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    MSCI 1110 - Introductory Military Science Laboratory I 1 hour


    Field application of skills taught in Military Science 1100, to include leadership, land navigation, tactical skills and basic soldier skills. Prerequisite: MSCI 1100 .
  
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    MSCI 1120 - Basic Leadership 1 hour


    Establishes foundation of basic leadership fundamentals such as problem solving, communication, briefings and effective writing, goal setting, techniques for improving listening and speaking skills and an introduction to counseling.
  
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    MSCI 1130 - Introductory Military Science Laboratory II 1 hour


    Field application of skills taught in Military Science 1120, to include leadership, land navigation, tactical skills and basic soldier skills. Prerequisite: MSCI 1120 .
  
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    MSCI 2200 - Individual Leadership Studies 2 hours


    Students identify successful leadership characteristics through observation of others and self through experimental learning exercises. Students record observed traits (good and bad) in a dimensional leadership journal and discuss observations in small group settings.
  
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    MSCI 2210 - Intermediate Military Science Lab I 1 hour


    Progressively more challenging leadership scenarios presented in a field and classroom environment. Students practice basic military skills such as squad-level offensive and defensive operations. First aid topics and drill and ceremony are also taught. Prerequisite: MSCI 2200 .
  
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    MSCI 2220 - Leadership and Teamwork 2 hours


    Study examines how to build successful teams, various methods for influencing action, effective communication in selling and achieving goals, the importance of timing the decision, creativity in the problem solving process, and obtaining team buy-in through immediate feedback.
  
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    MSCI 2230 - Intermed. Military Science Lab II 1 hour


    Progressively more challenging leadership scenarios presented in a field and classroom environment. Students practice basic military skills such as platoon-level offensive and defensive operations. Practical application of night land navigation. Prerequisite: MSCI 2220 .
  
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    MSCI 3160 - Death by a Thousand Cuts: Counterinsurgency/Insurgency the American Experience 3 hours


    This course explores the problem of insurgency and counterinsurgency in terms of what we can learn from these conflicts. It examines counterinsurgency theory and practice, the Philippine Insurrection, Banana Wars, Vietnam War, Afghanistan, and Iraq.
  
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    MSCI 3161 - The American Experience in Vietnam 3 hours


    This course was developed to provide students the opportunity to examine the American experience in the Vietnam War, to search for meanings in this experience, and to arrive at their own conclusions concerning the impact of the war upon the nation. Moreover, it challenges the students to think critically about war and the use of military power to settle differences between nations. May be repeated for credit.
  
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    MSCI 3162 - Counterinsurgency in Asia 3 hours


    This course explores the problem of insurgency and counterinsurgency in Asia in terms of what we can learn from these conflicts. The course examines the insurgency in the Philippine Insurrection 1899-1902, the Vietnam War, the Soviet-Afghan War, in Thailand, Sri Lanka and Malayan Emergency. May be repeated for credit.
  
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    MSCI 3163 - U.S. Military History in the Western Tradition 3 hours


    Analysis of United States military history from the Colonial period to the present, (1609-2012). It is a comprehensive look into the evolution of warfare in America, military traditions and heritage, and technology. This course analyzes the following: American Revolution, War of 1812, Mexican American War, Civil War, Indian Wars, Spanish American War, World War I, Inter War Period, World War II, Korean War, Vietnam War, Gulf War, Afghanistan and Iraq. All cadets are required to take this course for commissioning. May be repeated for credit.
  
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    MSCI 3164 - National Building through a Barrel of a Gun 3 hours


    This course was developed to provide students the opportunity to examine the dilemmas of military intervention, nation-building/peacekeeping operations and exit strategies. This course is designed to challenge students to think critically and arrive at their own conclusions about the use of military power to settle differences between nations, and use of military forces to conduct nation building.
  
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    MSCI 3165 - “Chasing Ghost”, The History of Irregular Warfare 3 hours


    This course explores the history of Irregular Warfare from the guerrilla perspective. The course examines the works of Mao Tse-Tung, Che Guevara, T.E. Lawrence and several other Guerrilla Leaders. You will analyze the evolution of Irregular Warfare through history and understand the complexities associated with the difficulties of countering and defecting Irregular Warfare.
  
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    MSCI 3230 - Leadership and Problem Solving 3 hours


    Students conduct self-assessment of leadership style, develop personal fitness regimen, and learn to plan and conduct individual/small unit tactical training while testing reasoning and problem-solving techniques. Students receive direct feedback on leadership abilities. Prerequisite: departmental consent.
  
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    MSCI 3240 - Leadership and Ethics 3 hours


    Examines the role communications, values, and ethics play in effective leadership. Topics include ethical decisionmaking, considerations of others, spirituality in the military, and survey Army leadership doctrine. Emphasis on improving oral and written communication ability. Prerequisite: MSCI 3230 .
  
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    MSCI 3250W - Leadership and Management 3 hours


    Develops student proficiency in planning and executing complex operations, functioning as a member of a staff, and mentoring subordinates. Students explore training management, methods of effective staff collaboration, and developmental counseling techniques. Prerequisite: MSCI 3240 .
  
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    MSCI 3260 - Officership 3 hours


    Study includes case study analysis of military law and practical exercises on establishing on ethical command climate, service as an officer; capstone exercise. Leadership lab Students must complete a semester long Senior Leadership Project that requires them to plan, organize, collaborate, analyze, and demonstrate their leadership skills. Prerequisite: MSCI 3250W .
  
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    MSCI 3270 - Advanced Transition to Lieutenant I 3 hours


    Independent research, analysis and monthly discussion on related military topics. Personal, academic and professional goals and objectives, development and maintenance of an officer evaluation report support form. Prerequisites: MSCI 1100 , MSCI 2200 , MSCI 3230 , and MSCI 3250W  or department chair permission.
  
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    MSCI 3280 - Advanced Transition to Lieutenant II 3 hours


    Independent research, analysis and monthly discussion on related military topics.  Personal, academic and professional goals and objectives, development and maintenance of an officer evaluation report support form. Prerequisites: MSCI 1100 , MSCI 2200 , MSCI 3230 , and MSCI 3250W  or department head permission.

Music (MUSI)

  
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    MUSI 101 - Music Seminar 0 hours


    Zero-credit, pass/fail course requires that students enrolled in applied music lessons attend two Music Program convocations, music major cohort meetings as scheduled and a minimum of 6 department or community recitals per semester. Pass/fail is determined by attendance.
  
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    MUSI 120 - Music and the Human Experience 3 hours


    This course explores classical music in the Western tradition as it relates to the broad spectrum of human experience from 1400 CE to modern times.
  
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    MUSI 123 - Music in World Cultures 3 hours


    This course explores music as an aspect of human culture focusing on selected non-Western music styles of Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe and the Americas. Course meets multicultural graduation requirement.
  
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    MUSI 134 - Music Theory I 3 hours


    Introduction to the fundamental materials of music. Includes a review of music fundamentals, the tonic, dominant, subdominant and leading tone triads, the triad in inversion, and the C clefs.  Corequisite: concurrent enrollment in MUSI 135 .
  
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    MUSI 135 - Aural Skills I 1 hour


    Students will pursue the development of musical independence, including sight singing, ear training, rhythmic reading, dictation, and part singing. Corequisite: concurrent enrollment in MUSI 134 .
  
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    MUSI 160 - Jane Froman Singers 1 hour


    The Jane Froman Singers, a select choral ensemble, is dedicated to the performance of advanced music ranging from Renaissance to contemporary works. Membership in the ensemble requires extensive rehearsal, performance, and travel. Students must complete four semesters of MUSI 160  or have obtained junior standing in order to take MUSI 360.
  
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    MUSI 170 - Show Choir 1 hour


    This lightly choreographed show choir ensemble performs music ranging from popular standards to contemporary works written especially for the group. Numbering around 12-16 voices, this group requires frequent performance at events on campus and in the community, as well as in featured cabaret style concerts each semester. Prerequisite: previous musical experience; audition required.
  
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    MUSI 171 - Applied Lessons Piano 1 hour


    The study of proper techniques of piano playing. Students must successfully complete each level twice before advancing to the next level.
  
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    MUSI 172 - Applied Lessons Piano 1 hour


    The study of proper techniques of piano playing. Students must successfully complete each level twice before advancing to the next level.
  
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    MUSI 174 - Class Piano I 3 hours


    Class instruction in basic techniques for students with no prior training in piano. Daily practice required. Part I of II.
  
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    MUSI 180 - Chamber Choir 1 hour


    The Chamber Choir serves as the primary lab choir for the beginning conducting class. The choir prepares and performs literature written for SSAA choirs (women) in odd spring semesters and TTBB choirs (men) in even spring semesters. Previous musical experience; audition required.
  
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    MUSI 181 - Applied Lessons Voice 1 hour


    The study of proper vocal techniques to enhance the production of the singing voice. Advanced courses extend the study and practice of proper techniques by using progressively technical vocal literature. Students must successfully complete each level twice before advancing to the next level. Prerequisite: ability to match pitch.
  
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    MUSI 182 - Applied Lessons Voice 1 hour


    The study of proper vocal techniques to enhance the production of the singing voice. Advanced courses extend the study and practice of proper techniques by using progressively technical vocal literature. Students must successfully complete each level twice before advancing to the next level. Prerequisite: ability to match pitch.
  
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    MUSI 183 - Musical Theater/Opera Workshop 1-3 hours


    Provides practical experience in the performance of opera and/or musical theater. The material to be performed is selected according to the abilities and potential of the students. Prerequisite: audition required.
  
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    MUSI 184 - Class Voice I 3 hours


    Elementary group lessons in voice. Basic vocal and music reading skills are addressed in addition to posture, breath control, tone production, and diction. Includes both group and individual singing of simple vocalizes and songs in English. Daily practice required. Part I of II. Prerequisites: ability to match pitch.
  
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    MUSI 220 - Exploring the Music of World Cultures 3 hours


    This course is the study of music as a culture, introducing students to a study of music from an international and cross-cultural perspective. The course will explore commonalities in how music is defined, valued, and utilized in cultures around the world. The cultures and music of Western Europe, Africa, Australia, Asia, South America, and the US will be explored.

     

  
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    MUSI 223 - Music History I 3 hours


    The History, style and musical forms of the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and the Seventeenth and Eighteenth centuries. Part I of II. Prerequisites: MUSI 134 , MUSI 135 .
  
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    MUSI 236 - Music Theory II 3 hours


    A continuation of MUSI 134 , expanding the tertian vocabulary to include all diatonic triads and secondary dominants, non-harmonic tones, diatonic seventh chords, and elementary modulation. Instruction includes binary and ternary forms. Prerequisites: a grade of C or higher in MUSI 134  and MUSI 135 . Corequisite: concurrent enrollment in MUSI 237 .
  
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    MUSI 237 - Aural Skills II 1 hour


    Students will pursue the development of musical independence, including sight singing, ear training, rhythmic reading, dictation, and part singing. A continuation of MUSI 135 . Prerequisites: a grade of C or higher in MUSI 134  and MUSI 135 . Corequisite: concurrent enrollment in MUSI 236 .
  
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    MUSI 273 - Applied Lessons Piano 1 hours


    The study of proper techniques of piano playing. Students must successfully complete each level twice before advancing to the next level.
  
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    MUSI 274 - Applied Lessons Piano 1 hour


    The study of proper techniques of piano playing. Students must successfully complete each level twice before advancing to the next level.
  
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    MUSI 275 - Class Piano II 3 hours


    A continuation of MUSI 174, must be taken continuously until the student has successfully completed the Piano Proficiency Exam. Daily practice required. Part II of II. Prerequisite: MUSI 174 .
  
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    MUSI 283 - Applied Lessons Voice 1 hour


    The study of proper vocal techniques to enhance the production of the singing voice. Advanced courses extend the study and practice of proper techniques by using progressively technical vocal literature. Students must successfully complete each level twice before advancing to the next level.
  
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    MUSI 284 - Applied Lessons Voice 1 hour


    The study of proper vocal techniques to enhance the production of the singing voice. Advanced courses extend the study and practice of proper techniques by using progressively technical vocal literature. Students must successfully complete each level twice before advancing to the next level.
  
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    MUSI 285 - Class Voice II 3 hours


    Intermediate group lessons in voice. Intermediate vocal and music reading skills are addressed in addition to posture, breath control, tone production and diction. Includes both group and individual singing of simple vocalizes and songs in the singing languages. Daily practice required. Part II of II. Prerequisite: MUSI 184  with a grade of C or higher.
  
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    MUSI 300 - Diction for Singers 3 hours


    This course introduces singers to the basic pronunciations of Italian, German, French and English as it applies to singing. Students will learn the International Phonetic Alphabet.
  
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    MUSI 322 - Masterpieces of Music 3 hours


    In-depth study of the lives and musical styles of great composers. No knowledge of music is required and students are not expected to perform in front of the class.
  
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    MUSI 323 - Music of the United States 3 hours


    Overview of the various types of music that have evolved through folk, popular and classical traditions in America from the Pilgrims to the present.
  
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    MUSI 326 - Music History II 3 hours


    The history, style and musical forms of the early Romantic through the 20th century and after. Part II of II. Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in MUSI 134 , MUSI 135 , MUSI 223 , MUSI 236 , and MUSI 237 .
  
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    MUSI 338 - Music Theory III 3 hours


    A continuation of MUSI 236, expanding the tertian vocabulary to all of the harmonic materials of tonal music. All diatonic and chromatic resources will be applied in creative projects. Instruction includes the formal structures of rondo, fugue, and sonata-allegro. Prerequisites: grade C or better in MUSI 236  and MUSI 237 . Corequisite: concurrent enrollment in MUSI 339 .
 

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