Aug 15, 2022  
Undergraduate Catalog 2019-2020 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2019-2020 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Chemistry (CHEM)

  
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    CHEM 455 - Directed Study 1-5 hours


    Individual research project covering a limited and well-focused aspect of theory, concept or application in a selected area of Chemistry. This course requires the approval of the Dean of the School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics and is available on the main campus only. Prerequisites: completion of at least 45 semester hours of coursework, prior completion of at least 6 semester hours of Chemistry courses, and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  
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    CHEM 456 - Directed Study 1-5 hours


    Individual research project covering a limited and well-focused aspect of theory, concept or application in a selected area of Chemistry. This course requires the approval of the Dean of the School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics and is available on the main campus only. Prerequisites: completion of at least 45 semester hours of coursework, prior completion of at least 6 semester hours of Chemistry courses, and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  
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    CHEM 457 - Directed Study 1-5 hours


    Individual research project covering a limited and well-focused aspect of theory, concept or application in a selected area of Chemistry. This course requires the approval of the Dean of the School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics and is available on the main campus only. Prerequisites: completion of at least 45 semester hours of coursework, prior completion of at least 6 semester hours of Chemistry courses, and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  
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    CHEM 490 - Senior Seminar 3 hours


    A seminar course required as a culminating experience prior to graduation for all seniors majoring in science. Students do library research project(s) from the field of natural sciences. A grade of C or higher is required. Prerequisites: senior standing; ENGL 133W ; CHEM 335 , a minimum of 26 hours of coursework with CHEM prefix.
  
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    CHEM 499 - Advanced Science Internship 1-3 hours


    Field experience working as an intern in a private or public agency. Supervised, on-site work is required. 45 clock hours of experiential work are required for each semester hour of credit. The directing faculty member must approve the internship placement. Students may register for no more than 12 science internship credits (399 and 499 combined) during their time at Columbia College. Grades are assigned as S (satisfactory) or U (unsatisfactory). Prerequisites: minimum 15 hours of completed courses in the major with a grade of C or higher; senior standing; declared major in Biology, Chemistry or Environmental Science; minimum 3.0 GPA in major core classes at time of registration for internship.

Child Development (CDEV)

  
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    CDEV 335 - Teaching Creative Arts and Movement to Children 3 hours


    Games, rhythms, music, singing, dance, drama, visual arts, materials, and methods utilized by elementary and pre-school classroom teachers to integrate the arts and kinesthetic movement into classroom instruction. Prerequisites: EDUC 300  or EDUC 505; and admission to the Teacher Certification Program . Cross-listed as EDUC 335 .

College Introductory Studies (COLL)

  
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    COLL 103 - Concepts of Physical Activity and Wellness 2 hours


    Basic knowledge, understanding, and values of physical activity and wellness.
  
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    COLL 104 - Peer-Advising Skills Seminar-Part I 0.5 hour


    Assists students in the development of basic skills needed to serve in Resident Assistant, Community Consultant or Peer Educator positions.
  
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    COLL 105 - Peer-Advising Skills Seminar-Part II 0.5 hour


    Assists students in the development of basic skills needed to serve in Resident Assistant, Community Consultant or Peer Educator positions. This is a continuation of the Peer Advising Skills Seminar - Part I.
  
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    COLL 106 - Strategic Studying Seminar 0.5 hour


    Designed to help students make the transition to the college setting by enhancing their study strategies. Topics include note-taking, reading textbooks, memory and organizational strategies, and test-taking skills.
  
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    COLL 107 - Career Development and Decision Making 0.5 hour


    This course focuses on career planning and practical tools for job hunting. Students will learn strategies for successfully getting work in their field of choice. For international students, this course is required if they will be working off-campus in a paid or unpaid job. (Unless credit is being gained in other ways as allowed by the International Center). Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and cumulative 2.0 GPA. Course may be repeated. Grades are assigned as S (satisfactory) or U (unsatisfactory).
  
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    COLL 108 - Analytical Thinking Seminar 0.5 hour


    Students improve analytical-thinking skills using in-class writing, take-home assignments, and group projects. They demonstrate their ability to sort out opinions, to interpret data, to recognize errors of perception, judgment, or reaction, to evaluate judgments, and to express their own opinions clearly and logically.
  
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    COLL 109 - Communicating to Our World: An Introduction to Leadership 0.5 hour


    Students learn about the social change model of leadership development. Through participation in the Emerging Leaders Institute (ELI), students have an opportunity to apply their learned knowledge to real life experiences. This class can only be taken by those chosen for the ELI Program.
  
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    COLL 133 - General Education Foundations Seminar 3 hours


    The Foundations Seminar provides an intensive academic experience designed to help new students learn the strategies necessary for success in college. Through exposure to a variety of broad topics, students will develop skills ranging from critical thinking and inquiry to maintaining one’s personal wellbeing. Students will also be introduced to digital literacy, and to the expectations of Columbia College and its faculty, including becoming familiar with the general education curriculum, degree requirements, and college catalog. All students with less than 24 credit hours post-high school are required to take this course in their first semester.
  
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    COLL 225 - Tutoring 0.5-3 hours


    Students tutor in specific subject areas. A student earns one elective semester hour for 45 clock hours of tutoring time. The student arranges a tutoring schedule with the supervisor and enrolls in this course after completing the required clock hours for credit. Prerequisite: to be determined by the faculty or staff supervisor of each student enrolling for discipline-specific tutoring.
  
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    INCC 111 - Introduction to Columbia College 2 hours


    Introduction to Columbia College and to the values of learning. The 16-week seminar provides students an opportunity to explore the goals of an ethics-based liberal arts education and to identify their role in the academic, cultural, and social community of Columbia College. The general education curriculum, degree requirements, college catalog, advising process, and student handbook are introduced. Additionally, students become familiar with the wide variety of resources available to help them meet their collegiate goals. All freshmen are strongly encouraged to enroll in this seminar during their first semester.
  
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    INCC 123 - Strategies for Success in College 3 hours


    This course is designed to prepare adult students to participate knowledgeably, meaningfully, and successfully in higher education. The emphasis is on acquiring the appropriate values, knowledge, and skills to take part in educational experience as an informed participant.
  
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    INCC 133 - Topics: Introduction to Columbia College for Student Support Services 1 hour


    This eight-week seminar should be taken following INCC 111 . It is designed to provide Student Support Services (SSS) participants with an overview of the history, requirements, benefits and services provided by Columbia College’s SSS program. Students assess and enhance their academic and interpersonal skills and expand their cultural knowledge and experience. Prerequisite: INCC 111  recommended.
  
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    INCC 233 - Topics: Analytical Problem Solving and Reading Comprehension 2 hours


    This course teaches techniques to enhance college reading comprehension and increase college vocabulary. The course also focuses on analytical thinking, logic and problem solving. Prerequisite: member of Student Support Services.

Communication Studies (COMM)

  
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    COMM 110 - Introduction to Speech 3 hours


    This course introduces students to basic skills necessary to function effectively in public communication situations, including informative and persuasive speaking. In addition, students will develop abilities to analyze and evaluate oral discourse as a means of becoming informed consumers of communication.
  
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    COMM 201 - Cross-Cultural Communication Practicum for Native English Speakers 1 hours


    Designed for native English speakers, this course provides a forum for connecting with English language learners (ELLs) for conversation and cultural exchange. Meeting with ELLs is also a unique opportunity to gain insight into the challenges and benefits of living and learning in America. Requirements include attending an orientation meeting as well as a “Match Dinner,” committing to meet with partner(s) weekly for one hour of conversation, and completing a final project. Grades are assigned as S (satisfactory) or U (unsatisfactory). This course can be repeated for credit up to two times. 
  
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    COMM 203 - Understanding Human Communication 3 hours


    Communication theories and models applied to intrapersonal, interpersonal, small-group and public settings. Principles practiced in verbal and non-verbal forms.
  
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    COMM 214 - Mass Communication in Society 3 hours


    History and development of the American mass media, to include examination of media roles in society, social advantages and disadvantages of media, and the role of the spectator/consumer towards the media. Prerequisite: COMM 110 .
  
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    COMM 217 - Food Communication 3 hours


    This course considers and analyzes the different relationships between communication and food and how these relationships influence our identities, cultures, and environments. Students will the symbolic importance of food in our cultures and everyday communication practices.

     

     

  
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    COMM 220W - Introduction to Theatre 3 hours


    Introduction to the elements utilized during the production of a play as well as an emphasis on increased appreciation of numerous major performance styles and genres. Prerequisites: ENGL 133W .
  
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    COMM 224 - Film History and Analysis 3 hours


    Introduction to the world history of cinema from its origins to the present, featuring important and influential films of various types and genres from several countries. Basic formal and technical aspects of the medium and means of analysis are also introduced. Course meets multicultural graduation requirement. Prerequisite: COMM 110 .
  
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    COMM 227 - News Literacy 3 hours


    This course teaches the skills and thought processes necessary to become conscientious users of news and information in the digital age. Prerequisite: COMM 110 .

     

  
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    COMM 230 - Introduction to Communication Theory 3 hours


    Introduction to theory, methodology, analysis and criticism. Skills learned in this course are the beginning foundation of those required to complete the capstone course and the major senior project. Prerequisites: sophomore standing, completion of one COMM course, and a C average in COMM courses.
  
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    COMM 231 - Communication Writing and Research 3 hours


    As a companion course to COMM 230, Communication Writing and Research provides an overview of the concepts, methods, and skills nascent researchers need, to write about their own research. In this research and writing intense course, student work will culminate in a communication research prospectus, based on current literature and research methods in the field. Prerequisite: COMM 230 .
  
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    COMM 233 - Topics 1-3 hours


    Specialized inquiry into a defined concept, topic, theory or application in Communication Studies. Topics are approved by the Language and Communication Studies Department.
  
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    COMM 298W - Nonverbal Communication 3 hours


    An introduction to the dynamics of nonverbal behavior across multiple contexts and situations, and to the relationship of nonverbal behavior to verbal messages and cultures. Prerequisite: COMM 110 .

     

     

  
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    COMM 303W - Intercultural Communication 3 hours


    Study of the role of communication in multicultural and intercultural context, including issues relating to values, language and non-verbal behavior as they relate to effective multicultural and intercultural interaction. Course meets multicultural graduation requirement. Prerequisite: sophomore standing and ENGL 133W 
  
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    COMM 304W - Introduction to Screenwriting 3 hours


    This course is an introduction to the art and craft of screenwriting. Students learn basic principles of screenwriting, including how screenwriting differs from other writing styles. Students explore the screenplay style and format, character development and story arcs through a film treatment and short screenplay. Prerequisite: ENGL 133W .
  
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    COMM 313 - Interpersonal Communication 3 hours


    An introduction to the process of face-to-face communication within personal relationships, family, community and the workplace. Prerequisite: COMM 110 .
  
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    COMM 320 - Advanced Theatre 3 hours


    Performance theory and criticism supporting current staging of monologues, duets and ensemble scripts in theatre and film. This course has a significant focus on advance acting skills and theatre on the global stage. Prerequisite: COMM 220W .
  
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    COMM 323W - Argumentation and Debate 3 hours


    Detailed study and application of rhetorical theories, including the analysis, evaluation and production of arguments. Course focuses on formal debate strategies in addition to rhetorical artifacts ranging from classical readings to contemporary discourse. Prerequisite: COMM 110  and ENGL 133W  . 
  
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    COMM 324 - Film Styles and Genres: (Specific Topic) 3 hours


    Intensive study of a specific body of films grouped by similarities in style, genre, period or cultural origin. Emphasis is on historical, theoretical, and critical issues. Topics vary. Sample topics: Documentary film; film adaptation; film authors; independent film; movie musicals. Course may be taken more than once when topic varies. Prerequisite: COMM 224 .
  
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    COMM 334 - Political Economy of Film and Media 3 hours


    Examination of the film industry and mass communication outlets as they pertain to political economy. Through the study of ownership as a business strategy and cultural construction, students explore the cultural influence of mass communication. Prerequisite: COMM 214  or COMM 224 .
  
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    COMM 343W - Gender Communication 3 hours


    Examination of the significant role of gender in human communication behaviors as enacted in social spaces of daily life. Cross-listed as WMST 343W . Prerequisite: sophomore standing and ENGL 133W 
  
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    COMM 344 - Visual Communication and Culture 3 hours


    Introduction of basic principles of perception and visual interpretation. Analysis and discussion addresses the dependent processes of rhetorical visual communication in media and film studies, cultural studies, art, literature and photography within the public sphere. Prerequisite: COMM 110 .
  
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    COMM 354 - Social Media and Virtual Communities 3 hours


    This course examines the ways humans communicate via social media and virtual communities. Grounded in communication theory, students appropriately engage, first-hand, with social media technologies to explore the manners of electronic communications maintenance, manipulation and community building. Technologies pertaining to this course include: smart mobs, blogs, collaboration tools, podcasts, viral video, social bookmarking and other evolving technologies. Prerequisite: COMM 214 .
  
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    COMM 360W - Oral Interpretation of Literature 3 hours


    Appreciation of poetry, prose and drama through oral performance. Prerequisite: COMM 110  and/or COMM 203  strongly recommended and ENGL 133W  .
  
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    COMM 380W - Performance Studies 3 hours


    Examination of classical and contemporary views of performance as a way of constituting meaning as well as to affirm individual and cultural identity at the crossroads of race, class and gender. Prerequisite: COMM 360W .
  
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    COMM 385 - Performance Styles and Genres: (Specific Topic) 3 hours


    Intensive study of a major performance style and genre. Emphasis is on the historical, theoretical and critical issues. Sample topics: poetry; personal narrative; performance art; prose; drama. Course may be taken more than once when the topic varies. Prerequisite: COMM 360W .
  
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    COMM 393 - Organizational Communication 3 hours


    Examination of communication processes with emphasis on systems theories, leadership, and interpersonal and group interaction in formal and informal organizational settings. Prerequisite: COMM 110 .
  
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    COMM 399 - Communication Internship 1-3 hours


    Students complete 45 hours of experiential work for each semester hour. The overall objective of this internship is to practice acquired communication skills and knowledge in a professional setting. Students work in conjunction with a directing faculty member who must approve the internship placement and specific learning goals. Students can register for no more than 12 internship (COMM 399 and COMM 499  combined) credits during their time at Columbia College. Grades are assigned as S (satisfactory) or U (unsatisfactory). Prerequisites: junior standing; minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA at time of registration of internship.
  
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    COMM 404 - Media Criticism 3 hours


    Theoretical and practical analysis of the content, structure and context of mediated communication in the United States. Students use cultural, critical and rhetorical strategies to evaluate media content. Prerequisites: COMM 214  and 3 hours of upper-level Communication coursework.
  
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    COMM 420 - Advanced Acting and Production Techniques 1-3 hours


    This course exposes students to the acting, directing and technical processes during the staging of a full-length production. Acting or managerial participation in a main stage production is a course requirement. The week prior to the performance will require evening and weekend rehearsal time required for participation in the class. All students must participate in the set production dates scheduled prior to production dates. This course may be taken for variable credit and up to three times. Prerequisite:  audition.
  
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    COMM 433 - Topics 1-3 hours


    Specialized inquiry into a defined concept, topic, theory or application in Communication Studies. Topics are approved by the Language and Communication Studies Department.
  
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    COMM 495 - Speech Communication Integrative Seminar 3 hours


    Culminating experience for the major; completion with a C or higher required. Advanced examination of the nature of communication theory, research and methods. With the instructor’s permission, a student not majoring in Speech Communication may enroll and propose a project specific to the Speech Communication discipline. Prerequisites: COMM 230 , C average or higher in Speech Communication courses; minimum of 15 hours of 300- or 400-level Communication courses; and senior standing.
  
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    COMM 499 - Advanced Communication Internship 1-3 hours


    Students complete 45 hours of experiential work for each semester hour. The overall objective of this internship is to practice acquired communication skills and knowledge in a professional setting. Students work in conjunction with a directing faculty member who must approve the internship placement and specific learning goals. Students can register for no more than 12 internship (COMM 399  and COMM 499  combined) credits during their time at Columbia College. Grades are assigned as S (satisfactory) or U (unsatisfactory). Prerequisites: COMM 399 ; senior standing; minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA at time of registration of internship.

Computer Information Systems (CISS)

  
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    CISS 145 - Introduction to Python Programming 3 hours


    This course introduces students to computer programming. Students design and build a substantial system using the Python language. The system will be selected from the following: 2-D/3-D games, CD player, image authoring tool. Prerequisite: C or higher in MATH 150 .
  
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    CISS 170 - Introduction to Computer Information Systems 3 hours


    Overview of computer hardware, software, programming and information systems as applied in the modern business environment. Hands-on applications of word processing, spreadsheet and data management software are used to explore use of microcomputers in business.
  
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    CISS 171 - Introduction to Computer Information Systems for MAC Users 3 hours


    Overview of computer hardware, software, programming, and information systems as applied in the modern business environment. Hands-on applications of word processing, spreadsheet, and data management software are used to explore use of microcomputers in business.
  
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    CISS 175 - Microcomputer-based Personal Productivity Tools 3 hours


    Use of advanced microcomputer-based personal productivity software (Microsoft Office) certification in Microsoft Office, using the skills assessment manager, and simple WEB page design. Prerequisite: CISS 170 .
  
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    CISS 176 - Introduction to Computer Science 3 hours


    This course provides a broad overview of computer science. It is designed to provide students with an appreciation for and an understanding of the many different aspects of computer science.
  
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    CISS 201 - Agile Software Development 3 hours


    This course is an introduction to software development with agile processes. Topics include: Scrum, Lean, Extreme Programming, Kanban, agile requirements, coding, testing, version control, and project management.
  
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    CISS 202 - Introduction to Databases 3 hours


    This course is an introduction to the basic techniques and theory in relational databases. Topics include: database concepts and architecture, data modeling, database design, normalization, denormalization, SQL, relational algebra, and database programming.
  
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    CISS 234 - Visual Basic 3 hours


    An introduction to programming using Visual Basic. Emphasis is on Visual Basic syntax and creating user interfaces in Visual Basic. Topics include application design, using variables and constants, the selection and repetition structures, sequential access files, menus, dialog boxes and error trapping, random access files, database access and arrays. Prerequisites: Grade of C or higher in MATH 150 , or a score of 24 or higher on the math portion of the ACT or 540 or higher on the math portion of the SAT.
  
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    CISS 238 - Java Programming 3 hours


    An introduction to programming using Java. Topics include methods, classes, objects, advanced object concepts, input, selection, repetition, arrays and strings, applets, HTML, graphics, inheritance concepts, abstract windows tool kit, file input and output. Prerequisites: Grade of C or higher in MATH 150 , or a score of 24 or higher on the math portion of the ACT or 540 or higher on the math portion of the SAT.
  
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    CISS 240 - Introduction to Programming 4 hours


    Program design and development using C++. A disciplined approach to problem solving and algorithm development is stressed using top-down design. Topics include syntax and semantics, input/output, selection, iterative constructs, functions, data types, arrays, strings, pointers and recursion. Prerequisites: Grade of C or higher in MATH 150 , or a score of 24 or higher on the math portion of the ACT or 540 or higher on the math portion of the SAT. 
  
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    CISS 241 - Programming I 3 hours


    Program design and development using C++. A disciplined approach to problem solving and algorithm development is stressed using top-down design. Topics include syntax and semantics, input/output, selection, iterative constructs, functions, data types arrays, strings, pointers, and recursion. Prerequisites: Grade of C or higher in MATH 150 , or a score of 24 or higher on the math portion of the ACT or 540 or higher on the math portion of the SAT. 
  
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    CISS 242 - Programming II 3 hours


    A continuation of CISS 241 . Topics include strings, pointers, recursion, classes, methods, and operator overloading. Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CISS 241 .
  
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    CISS 243 - Programming III 3 hours


    A continuation of CISS 242 . Topics include inheritance, polymorphism, templates, stream I/O, file processing, stacks, queues, and lists. Prerequisites: grade of C or higher in CISS 242 .
  
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    CISS 245 - Advanced Programming 4 hours


    A continuation of CISS 240 . Topics include object oriented programming in C++ with classes, methods, inheritance, dynamic memory allocation, file streams, linked lists and stacks. Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in CISS 240 .
  
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    CISS 280 - Systems Analysis and Design I 3 hours


    The first in a two-course sequence (see CISS 320 ). Explores requirements, and methods for documenting and analyzing existing business information systems; includes investigation and development of alternative solutions. Prerequisite: CISS 234  or CISS 238  or CISS 241 .
  
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    CISS 298 - Web Programming 3 hours


    Introduction to web programming issues associated with developing web applications and website design.
  
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    CISS 301 - Operating Systems for Business Computing 3 hours


    Introduction to computer operating systems functions and management. Topics include memory, process, device, file, network function management and concurrent processes, security and ethics. Prerequisites: junior standing.
  
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    CISS 302 - Business Data Communications and Networking 3 hours


    Introduction to business computer networking. Topics include network architecture with layered models; network technologies with LAN, MAN and WAN; network security, design and management. Prerequisites: junior standing.
  
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    CISS 311 - Advanced Agile Software Development 3 hours


    This course is a second course in agile software development. Topics include in-depth coverage of scrum, team productivity, culture, pace sustainability, technical debt, cost estimation, documentation and contract writing. Prerequisites: CISS 201  and CISS 202 
  
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    CISS 312 - ACM Programming Contest 1 hour


    Open to computer majors participating in the ACM Programming Contest. Evaluation is Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Prerequisites: junior standing, computer major - either CIS or CS. May be repeated for a total of 3 semester hours.
  
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    CISS 320 - Systems Analysis and Design II 3 hours


    A continuation of CISS 280 . Explores the design and implementation of information systems, selection of alternatives, object-oriented design techniques, ISO 9001 software quality assurance mechanisms. Prerequisite: CISS 280  with a grade of C or higher.
  
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    CISS 338 - Advanced Java Programming 3 hours


    This is the second course for programming in Java. Topics include: AWT, swing, multithread, JavaFX, recursion, generics, networking, and database. Prerequisites: CISS 238   and junior standing.
  
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    CISS 350 - Advanced Algorithms and Data Structures 3 hours


    Advanced concepts of data, storage, organization, and retrieval. Topics include multiple-linked lists, balanced trees, graphs, abstract data types, classes and methods, object-oriented programming, searching and sorting. Prerequisite: CISS 245  or CISS 243 .
  
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    CISS 355 - Directed Study 1-3 hours


    Research project covering a limited and well-focused aspect of theory, concept or application in a selected area of CIS not covered in-depth in the curriculum. A term paper documenting the research and results is required. This course requires the approval of the chair of the Computer and Mathematical Sciences Department and is available on the main campus only. Prerequisite: CISS 245  or CISS 243 .
  
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    CISS 358 - Algorithm Analysis 3 hours


    Introduction to algorithm analysis and complexity classes including advanced data structures such as B-trees, height-balanced trees, and graphs. Analysis of various searching and sorting algorithms and algorithm design topics such as dynamic programming, greedy methods, and divide-and-conquer. Prerequisites: MATH 225 ; CISS 245  or CISS 243 .
  
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    CISS 360 - Computer Systems and Assembly Language 3 hours


    Introduction to the fundamental concepts of computer systems including data representation, computer arithmetic, Boolean algebra, SSI Logic Design, register-transfer and micro-operations, computer organization, assemblers and assembly language programming. Prerequisite: CISS 245  or CISS 243 .
  
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    CISS 362 - Introduction to Automata Theory, Languages and Computation 3 hours


    The study of formal languages, grammars, abstract computer models and computability. Different models of computation and their relationships with formal languages as well as capabilities and limitations of these models are studied from a theoretical perspective. Cross-listed as MATH 362 . Prerequisites: MATH 225  and CISS 240 .
  
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    CISS 365 - Project Management 3 hours


    An introduction to project management issues associated with information technology projects including project definition, organizational structures, risk factors, quality management, and procurement management. Prerequisites: MGMT 254  and one of CISS 311 ,  CISS 320  or CISS 325 .
  
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    CISS 367 - Cybercrime 3 hours


    Cybercrime is an interdisciplinary survey of high-technology crime from criminal justice and computer science perspectives from the characterization and theory of cybercrime to the acquisition and preservation of evidence. Cross-listed with CJAD 367  .  Prerequisites/Corequisites: CJAD 101  , or CISS 201  , or CISS 202 
  
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    CISS 370 - Operating Systems 3 hours


    The hardware, firmware and software organization of computer systems, basic operating systems concepts, concurrent processes, CPU and disk scheduling, memory management, deadlocks, systems evaluation and simulation, and performance measurement. Prerequisites: CISS 350  or CISS 358 .
  
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    CISS 375 - Compiler Construction 3 hours


    Concepts and theories of compiler design and language translation. Lexical analysis, syntax specification, parsing, error recovery, syntax directed translation, semantic analysis, symbol tables, and run-time storage. Prerequisite: CISS 350  or CISS 358 .
  
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    CISS 380 - Computer Graphics 3 hours


    Techniques for picture development and transformation, curve and surface approximation and projections, graphical languages, data structures and their implementation, graphical systems, and animation techniques. Prerequisite: CISS 350  or CISS 358 .
  
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    CISS 390 - Global Information Systems Management 3 hours


    Introduction to global information systems management issues associated with culture, politics and geo-economics, international IS standards and regulations, outsourcing and off-shoring. Course meets multicultural graduation requirement. Prerequisite: junior standing.
  
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    CISS 391 - Information Systems Security 3 hours


    Introduction to information systems security issues associated with formal and informal systems’ protection, detection and responses. Prerequisite: junior standing.
  
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    CISS 397 - Business Data Analytics 3 hours


     

    This course is an introduction to the basic techniques in business data analytics. Topics include: collecting, storing, accessing, and manipulating large datasets, data visualization, predictive analytics, and clustering.

  
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    CISS 399 - Information Systems Internship 1-6 hours


    Students complete 45 hours of experiential work for each credit hour. Typical internships include application development, database design and development, network management, and helpdesk customer service. The directing faculty member must approve the internship placement. Grades are assigned as S (satisfactory) or U (unsatisfactory).

    Prerequisites: Junior standing. Students must have completed at least 6 hours of CISS prefix courses with a grade of C or better in each course. Minimum cumulative 2.5 GPA at time of registration of internship. Students may register for no more than six hours of CISS 399 during their time at Columbia College.

  
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    CISS 400 - Digital Forensics 3 hours


    An interdisciplinary approach to learning about best practices in digital and networking evidence preservation and processing involving computers, storage media and mobile devices. Cross-listed with FRSC 400 . Prerequisites: One of FRSC 210 CISS 301 , CISS 302 , CISS 370 , or CISS 410 
  
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    CISS 402 - Advanced Database 3 hours


    This course is a second course in database systems. Topics include: object-based models, storage architecture, data architecture, advanced SQL, NoSQL, transaction, performance tuning, distributed databases, security, social and ethical issues. Prerequisite: CISS 202 
  
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    CISS 410 - Computer Networks and Communications 3 hours


    Network architecture and the OSI model. Physical protocols for data transmission and error detection/correction, data link concepts, LAN protocols, internetworking, end-to-end service and security considerations. Prerequisite: CISS 350 .
  
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    CISS 411 - Software Architecture and Testing 3 hours


    This course is about software architecture theory and methods. Topics include technical, project, business, and professional aspects of architecture, and how it is used in agile projects, and emerging technologies. Prerequistes: CISS 298  and CISS 311 
  
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    CISS 420 - Computer Architecture 3 hours


    Introduces fundamental concepts of computer architecture including data representation, computer arithmetic, Boolean algebra, combinational logic design, sequential circuits, registers and counters, memory and programmable logic devices, instruction set architecture, CPU design, input-output, and memory systems. Prerequisite: CISS 360 .
  
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    CISS 430 - Database Systems 3 hours


    Design and implementation of relational and object-oriented database systems. Relational algebra, normal forms and normalization, query processing, efficiency and security considerations. Prerequisite: CISS 285  or CISS 280  .
  
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    CISS 433 - Topics 1-3 hours


    Specialized inquiry into a defined concept, topic, theory or application in Computer Science or Information Systems. Topics are approved by the Computer and Mathematical Sciences Department. Prerequisites:  Junior standing.
  
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    CISS 438 - Object-Oriented Design and Analysis 3 hours


    Introduction to object-oriented (OO) analysis, design and modeling. Topics include techniques for mapping real-world systems onto an OO representation, use case design, OO methodology for software development, identifying patterns, building conceptual models and OO implementation issues. The Unified Modeling Language will be used as a modeling tool. Prerequisite: CISS 350  or CISS 358 .
  
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    CISS 445 - Programming Languages 3 hours


    Survey and comparison of various programming languages and the concepts used in designing, specifying and evaluating languages. Topics include formal specification, language constructs, translation, binding and binding times, logic and functional programming. Prerequisite: CISS 350  or CISS 358 .
  
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    CISS 450 - Artificial Intelligence 3 hours


    Concepts and theories of intelligent computer systems. Issues of perception, learning, problem solving and knowledge representation discussed. Programming in a list processing language will be required. Applications to game playing, theorem proving, expert systems, language understanding. Prerequisite: CISS 350  or CISS 358 .
  
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    CISS 451 - Introduction to Cryptography and Computer Security 3 hours


    An introduction to cryptography and computer security. Topics include cryptographic methods, hash functions, key exchange, secure communication, message authentication, digital signatures, network security, system security, modern day security protocols and standards. Cross-listed as MATH 451 . Prerequisites: MATH 225  and CISS 245  or CISS 243 .
  
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    CISS 455 - Directed Study 1-3 hours


    Individual research project covering a limited and well-focused aspect of theory, concept or application in a selected area of Computer Science or Information Systems. This course requires the approval of the chair of the Computer and Mathematical Sciences Department and is available on the main campus only. Prerequisites: Completion of at least 45 semester hours of coursework, prior completion of at least 6 semester hours of CISS courses, and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  
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    CISS 465 - Software Engineering 3 hours


    An introduction to software engineering including process methods, software metrics, configuration management, risk analysis, testing techniques and quality assurance, project management and tracking. Prerequisite: CISS 243  or CISS 245 .
 

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